15 amp 120v to 30 amp 120v?

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Old 03-07-15, 01:10 PM
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15 amp 120v to 30 amp 120v?

I just bought a new laminator that has a 30 amp 120 v power supply. It will be placed in my garage for the time being, which has a normal 15 amp 120v circuit running throughout. My dryer is also locating on the other side of the wall where I will be installing the laminator. I am 99% sure it is 240 since it has a double 30 amp breaker.

I have Googled a lot, but I am not finding what I need. Is there either a way to convert the 15 amp circuit to 30 amp, or put a junction box before my dryer and pull the necessary power from that line? My box is located in the basement in the middle of my house, so running a new line would be difficult to say the least.

Thanks for any help
 
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Old 03-07-15, 01:20 PM
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Well, you can't repurpose the 15 amp circuit in any way. It has only 14 gauge wire and you need 10 gauge. You also can't use the circuit to your dryer since it will be overloaded. I see no other alternative than to run a new circuit.
 
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Old 03-07-15, 01:33 PM
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Despite the difficulty running a new circuit is the only way to do this within code.
 
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Old 03-07-15, 01:38 PM
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Only way within code, and the only way to avoid burning down your house!
 
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Old 03-07-15, 02:05 PM
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Thanks for the quick reply all. I was afraid of this answer though... I've started looking at my setup to see how I'm going to get a #10 line in. Times like this I wish my basement wasn't finished.

Don't know if this matters, but I wasn't thinking. My garage is a 20 amp line. The laminator I got can go up to 300 degrees, but the max I will ever be running it is about 100 degrees. The draw then is going to be far less than what is capable of. Since I will always be pulling significantly less watts than it is rated for do you think a 20 amp circuit could handle the load? I'm thinking if I can verify it is under 2,000 watts and I'm not running anything else on the circuit I would be okay?
 
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Old 03-07-15, 02:18 PM
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Is this what the plug on your laminator looks like?

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Old 03-07-15, 04:07 PM
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You should be able to find a nameplate on the unit or look in the manual for the wattage/current draw. The unit will draw what ever it is designed to draw, it has nothing to do with temperature. Temperature will only dictate how often, and how long the unit is running to heat up, depending on load.

Find the watts or amps on the machine and this will tell us what size circuit you need.
 
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Old 03-07-15, 04:41 PM
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Adding to what Tolyn wrote:
30 amp 120 v power supply
Is 30 amps the output of the power supply or input. Is the power supply output voltage 120v AC or something else.

If it needs a power supply then it is likely it does not run on 120 volts AC or it wouldn't need a power supply. The 120 vac would be for the power supply not the machine. So it is the specs on the power supply not the machine that would be relevant. If nothing else please give us a make and model number.
 
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Old 03-07-15, 06:08 PM
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The plug is an L5-30.

The power supply says 110v-120v 30 amp 50-60 hz. It doesn't say anything about wattage and after looking in the manual there is no additional detail.

If it helps, this is the laminator I have http://www.bestdgi.com/html/pro65s_m.html

I have resigned to the fact I am going to have to run a new circuit. Unfortunately I am going against the joists, so this is going to be a chore. I do have a duct trunk that runs from my utility room to the end of my house. Can I run a electrical line parallel next to that trunk? Just want to make sure I wouldn't be breaking code or putting my fam in danger.
 
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Old 03-07-15, 06:21 PM
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I do have a duct trunk that runs from my utility room to the end of my house. Can I run a electrical line parallel next to that trunk?
Yes, if you mean ducts run in it not it is used as a duct. Have you considered using surface raceway to run from the panel to the duct trunk?
 
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Old 03-07-15, 06:28 PM
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Can I run a electrical line parallel next to that trunk?
Yes, you can fish along side duct work.

From the link it says your machine is 32 amps. It also says specs are "subject to change" so lets hope it is true, otherwise you would be looking at a 40 amp circuit. You might want to contact the manufacture and get the "real" info on the machine.
 
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Old 03-07-15, 06:32 PM
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At those amps I'd ask about a 240 volt version. In fact I wonder why it isn't 240 only.
 
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Old 03-07-15, 08:56 PM
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I thought the same thing!
 
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Old 03-07-15, 10:06 PM
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Using Google it seems the company doesn't exist except as a name at the sellers. That coupled with the odd voltage and amps screams China. We have these threads all the time about equipment built in China by people who don't have a real understanding of U.S. electric service. I'd steer clear of any equipment whose manufacturer can not be found on the web. The company is may be nothing more then an office with a couple of employes that contracts to which ever Chinese factory bids the lowest. What are you going to do when you need parts and help to fix it?
 
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Old 03-08-15, 04:34 PM
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Talking

Thanks all for your help. I instinctively would have been a lot more leery, but I spent a couple months researching and the sign industry is a very vocal group. If there is a good product they let you know and if there is a bad one they REALLY let you know. The feedback on these laminators is pretty much unanimously positive. The other good thing is it comes with a 3 year warranty and the guy that runs it is in Florida and very responsive. Overall, I feel pretty confident it will do the job.

So I just finished running the new circuit. Couple holes later and it wasn't all that tough. Before I start tying everything up I had a couple questions I wanted to get clarified. Next to that trunk there is a flexible gas line that I ran the line next to and also for ease of fishing, I put in some pvc conduit for the straight run next to the ductwork. Will either of those be an issue? If the pvc is I can easily pull it out, but if there is no issue I might as well leave it.

Thanks again for all the help. Couldn't have done it without you
 
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Old 03-08-15, 04:51 PM
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A PVC sleeve or conduit next to a gas line is not an issue.
 
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Old 03-08-15, 08:10 PM
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We have these threads all the time about equipment built in China by people who don't have a real understanding of U.S. electric service.
From the link provided I see no indication that the laminator is listed by U.L. or any other NRTL.
 
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Old 03-09-15, 07:44 AM
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I don't see any reason you couldn't run this off the dryer circuit as long as you unplug the dryer while doing it. Just put a dryer plug on the laminator machine cord or make an adapter cable from the 10-30/14-30 to the 5-30 using the appropriate connectors and #10 cord. The dryer circuit is certainly capable of powering it.

I do have the same concerns as the other posters with regard to the laminator machine itself, given that it doesn't seem to be approved for use in the U.S.
 
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Old 03-09-15, 09:31 AM
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But the dryer receptacle would need to be 4-wire so that you had a ground for the machine.
 
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