Kitchen wiring for minor remodel

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  #1  
Old 03-07-15, 07:09 PM
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Kitchen wiring for minor remodel

I'm doing a minor kitchen remodel but it involves removing a bulkhead and I'm going to be adding some lights and a couple of receptacles.

On the image I've drawn(please excuse my schematic skills), everything is drawn out as it exists. I've drawn in marker(red and green) the way I would wire it if I didn't have the advantage of asking here. Since I do, I'd like to know if this wiring looks legit, or needs some changes.

Please critique this and let me know what you think. I'm planning on running most of it on one 20a circuit and the main lights on their own 15a circuit.

A couple of notes before you look at the image:

1) the up/down arrows are switches
2) the garbage disposal and dishwasher are both on separate circuits currently
3) the only lighting in the room is a single fixture in the center of the ceiling which is controlled by one switch.
4) all of these receptacles are currently on the same circuit (which blew my mind because they also looped in a couple receptacles from an adjacent room)

Thanks!

 
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  #2  
Old 03-07-15, 07:53 PM
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You need a minimum of 2 small appliance branch circuits ,each 20 amps,fridge dedicated 20 amp circuit,if the adjacent room isn't the dinning room or family room they can't be on any of those circuits.
Geo
 
  #3  
Old 03-07-15, 08:22 PM
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The NEC does not require a dedicated 20 amp or even a dedicated 15 amp circuit for the refrigerator. It can be on one of the 20 amp small appliance circuits. The gas stove can also be on the small appliance circuit.
 
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Old 03-08-15, 08:47 AM
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Sorry, your right,as long as is as it not more than 80% of the circuit.
Geo
 
  #5  
Old 03-08-15, 09:24 AM
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Preface: I am not an electrician and I did pass my Canadian wireing inspection last year. Check local codes.

Code here put Fridge, dishwasher and built in microwave on dedicated circuits. (15, 20 and 20amp).

Counter plugs need to be staggered ABCDABCD so "A" plug is at least one plug away from the second "A" plug. No more than 2 plugs per breaker and any in yhe wet zone need GFCI at the breaker or plug.

We also need a stove plug even if gas is installed... not sure why.

Also, either you diagram is wrong or I cant read it.

p.s. if you have large cluster of switches just buy the deep boxes in the first place to avoid boxfill issues.
 

Last edited by ThumbBanger; 03-08-15 at 09:27 AM. Reason: p.s.
  #6  
Old 03-08-15, 12:02 PM
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Receptacles that serve the counter space is not required to be staggered, that is a CEC code. Neither is the "2 per device" rule. NEC only requires that at least 2 20 amp circuit serve the counter top receptacles. All counter top receptacles are required to be GFCI protected as is the dishwasher per 2014 code.

A receptacle is required for gas ranges because they still need 120 volts for the clock and spark. A standard 120v 15 or 20 amp receptacle is fine.
 
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Old 03-08-15, 12:19 PM
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I'm not confirming your wiring method as far as running cable from box to box, there are many ways to do that.
But overall you're in better shape than most.

- Lighting circuit looks fine
- DW and disposal are good to go, leave as is and don't tap into either circuit
- You have 1 small appliance circuit, you need 2

So all you need to consider:

- Add one additional circuit for small appliance/counter receptacles. They don't need to be staggered as in Canada, but you do want to lay them out in some order that makes sense. An example would be a galley kitchen. One circuit for each wall, or in an "L" shaped kitchen, one circuit for each working area.

- If you plan an over the range Microwave/Hood, run a circuit for that. Same for a built-in Microwave

- Gas range igniters can be run off counter circuit. However, if you plan on a high-end range, a circuit for that might be in order. Some gas convection ovens require a dedicated circuit because they have heating elements in the fan and most have a warming drawer
 
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Old 03-08-15, 07:39 PM
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All counter top receptacles are required to be GFCI protected as is the dishwasher per 2014 code.
I think the 2014 code also requires the disposer to be GFCI protected. Please, someone correct me if I am wrong about that.
 
  #9  
Old 03-09-15, 06:07 AM
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Joe, it appears that only the DW was added art. 210-8 D.
Geo
 
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Old 03-09-15, 07:17 PM
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Ok, I'm getting confused somewhat. I'm going to take some of the advice here and redo my drawing based on that info.

I've already done my main lighting circuit(the 6 high hats), but for that, I just used the existing circuit. In the process of installing the lights, I traced all fixtures on that circuit and I can now conclusively state that the lighting circuit contains:

- (6) high hats(all LED) which I installed
- (1) outside under-porch lamp(pre-existing)
- (1) duplex receptacle in another room

Seems like that circuit is good to go - no?

Here's my updated schematic(if you can call it that)



Questions:

1) Does my DW have to have it's own 20a circuit?
2) Can my GD share the the DW circuit?
3) I need "2 small appliance circuits" - does that mean receptacles that are located over the counter?
4) Do I need both of the GFI's I've illustrated?

Thanks! You all are a tremendous help.
 
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Last edited by moveright; 03-09-15 at 07:42 PM.
  #11  
Old 03-09-15, 08:06 PM
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The DW and GD can typically share a circuit. Check the nameplate data.

Yes you need 2 20 amp circuits to serve the kitchen receptacles. No lighting on these circuits.
 
  #12  
Old 03-10-15, 06:35 AM
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I don't really like the idea of having the refrigerator on a circuit that goes to an adjacent room,what is the load on that circuit?
Geo
 
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Old 03-10-15, 07:16 AM
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3) I need "2 small appliance circuits" - does that mean receptacles that are located over the counter?
Yes. It's the counter top receptacles. Each receptacle needs GFCI protection.

Looks like you're almost there as far as a plan. The only thing I see wrong now is that you're powering the pendant lights and under cabinet lights from one of your appliance circuits. These lights need to be powered from a lighting circuit.
If that is a 3-gang box you plan to use, 2 switches and 1 GFCI, it's OK to have 2 circuits in that box.
 
  #14  
Old 03-10-15, 01:04 PM
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The refrigerator needs to be a dedicated circuit if it is not on one of the small appliance circuits.
 
  #15  
Old 03-10-15, 01:21 PM
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Ok, I'm getting this step by step. NEC is so complicated! Please check me below.

-Fridge on separate circuit (15a ok?) OR tied into one of the small appliance circuits
-ALL receptacles on counter need to be GFI protected (I thought only near the sink)
-Should my small appliance circuits be 20a?
-What about my range? It's a gas range/gas oven - nothing fancy, $550 model. Can I tie that into one of my small appliance/counter circuits?


Thanks again! This is seriously helpful.
 
  #16  
Old 03-10-15, 01:54 PM
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Refrigerator, either a dedicated 15 or on one of the 20 amp countertop appliance circuits.

A countertop receptacles on one of two 20 amp circuits, gfi protected.

Gas range can be on small appliance circuit. Someone else said their instructions said not to be gfi protected.
 

Last edited by pcboss; 03-10-15 at 02:17 PM.
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