Electrical Problem


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Old 03-11-15, 06:15 PM
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Electrical Problem

Hello, new member here with a question. I have an out building that I have had electricity in for 23 years. I have a main power line coming from my outside power box. It runs about 75 feet to my shop. The shop has about 5 outlets and a light and a light switch. My power is not working now. I have flipped the breaker and still no power. I have removed the breaker from the box and took the wires and put the ground on a different bar and put the hot into the breaker again. Still no power. Any suggestions? Thanks in advance for any help. del
 
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Old 03-11-15, 06:22 PM
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With an inexpensive analog multimeter, check hot to ground (not neutral) in your receptacles. You may have power, but a loose neutral could be the culprit.
 
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Old 03-11-15, 06:40 PM
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I do not have an analog meter but I will get one. I have another question. I am not an electrician so I am ignorant on these things. I have a white wire that is screwed to the breaker and a black wire that is not attached to anything in the breaker box and a naked ground wire screwed to the grounding bar in the main box. should the black wire be attached to anything in the breaker box?
 
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Old 03-11-15, 06:40 PM
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The circuit might also be GFCI protected. Check inside and outside for a tripped GFCI device.

should the black wire be attached to anything in the breaker box?
Not necessarily. The white would be from a 240 volt circuit like a A/C condenser. The black wire could be extra or from a circuit that is no longer used anymore.
 
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Old 03-11-15, 06:45 PM
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I don't think there is a GFCI. I did have a 220 line for a small welder years ago but I got rid of it and changed the wiring to a 110. The power had been on but for some reason now it will not. Very frustrating.
 
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Old 03-11-15, 06:56 PM
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I did have a 220 line for a small welder years ago but I got rid of it and changed the wiring to a 110.
Did you have any cable other then the one for the welder at that time? Is the cable you converted the cable that no longer works?

If that is the cable that no longer works the black of the cable should be connected to the breaker and the white to the neutral bar. Is that how you did it? What is the color of the outer sheath of the cable?

Note: Nominal voltage is 120/240.
 
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Old 03-11-15, 07:01 PM
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No sir. I ran a new grey cable. So the white goes to The neutral bar and the black goes to the breaker? What about the naked wire? thank you so much for the help
 
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Old 03-11-15, 07:36 PM
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If the breaker box does not have a ground bar it goes to the neutral bar. Is that how you have it connected?
I do not have an analog meter but I will get one.
Be sure it isn't digital. An $8-$15 one is all you need. Don't let the no-nothings at BigBox talk you into a digital multimeter or a non contact tester.
 
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Old 03-11-15, 08:20 PM
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ok, which bar is the ground bar and which one is the neutral bar? I am going tomorrow to get a meter. Sorry for all the questions, I am just ignorant of electrical work. Again, thank yall for all of yall's advice and time. del
 
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Old 03-11-15, 08:49 PM
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If you only have one panel in the house the neutrals and ground go to the same bar. If in doubt, follow the existing wiring.

One neutral per hole.
 
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Old 03-11-15, 09:54 PM
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When you go to the homecenter to buy the meter also look for (and buy) the book Wiring Simplified. It is less than ten dollars and is normally found in the electrical aisle.
 
 

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