220 volt outlet makes dryer stick out into hallway (pics)

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  #1  
Old 03-24-15, 10:23 AM
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220 volt outlet makes dryer stick out into hallway (pics)

Whirlpool Dryer
Model-LER6620PQ0

My laundry room (closet) is 5'8" x 2'5" which is barely big enough to accommodate the washer and dryer. Name:  IMG_1228.jpg
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As you can see, the dryer juts out into the door frame even though it's as far back as it can go. The problem is that because the 220v outlet/plug sticks out about 3.5" the dryer backs up against them and not the wall.
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Here is the outlet with the dryer pulled out
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The room had 2 folding doors when we bought the house but I had to take them off because when they folded open they prevented the dryer door from opening.

I was wondering if anyone could give me some advice on moving the 220v outlet. I was thinking I could cut out a square of drywall between 2 wall studs and either screw the outlet into the side of a stud or install some kind of plastic recessed cove (like the ones for the water/drainage hoses on a washing machine) and screw the outlet into that.

Something like this
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I don't know much about electrical work but it seems like as long as I cut the breaker off there shouldn't be too much risk in trying to move it.

Thanks in advance for any help you can offer!

David
 
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  #2  
Old 03-24-15, 10:53 AM
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This is an electrical question not an appliance question so I have moved you to Electrical. Just install a box and set the receptacle flush with the wall. There should be no reason to use a surface mount like that.

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Sources: icreatables

Picture above shows a new work box but if you use an old work box you only need to cut a hole for the box.
 
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Old 03-24-15, 11:07 AM
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Sorry for the misplaced post, thanks for moving it for me and thanks for the advice!
 
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Old 03-24-15, 11:33 AM
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Just an observation, but, before you go there, you may want to take a closer look at your actual gain, because you still need space for the vent line.
 
  #5  
Old 03-24-15, 12:03 PM
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I agree. The vent hose is already being squished because the dryer exit does not line up with the hole in the wall. Very bad situation there. You will need to cut out a section of the drywall there to make it right but this needs to be fixed.
 
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Old 03-24-15, 12:07 PM
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Looks like the while plastic flex duct that is not for use with dryers anyway. The ductwork should be metal.
 
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Old 03-24-15, 12:09 PM
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I think I'd be taking out the drywall in the back of the closet.
 
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Old 03-24-15, 12:24 PM
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If you decide to use a recessed receptacle, be sure to use a 2 gang box. I would use a Smartbox that screwed to the studs over a old work box.
 
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Old 03-24-15, 12:25 PM
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In the past in situations Like this I have built an alcove (recess) into the wall all the way to the wall board on the other side. Not the best idea though on an outside wall in areas where it gets cold.

Some dryers can be modified for side venting. There seems to be enough room between the washer and dryer to do that. It may also be possible to move the receptacle to the center.

If your interested in side venting start a thread on that in appliances.
 
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Old 03-24-15, 02:24 PM
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Getting the 240 outlet back is not as big of problem as getting vent right. If vent is blocked at all you will have constant dryer problems.
 
  #11  
Old 03-24-15, 08:31 PM
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I worried about the dryer vent when we first moved into this house. But after 4 years I guess I stopped worrying about it because I've never had an issue with the dryer properly drying clothes and there is always a steady, strong stream of hot air coming out of the vent on the outside of the house.

But since I have never gotten anything other than good, honest advice on these forums and everyone here seems to be in agreement about it being a hazard, I will look into repositioning the vent immediately.

I always hoped I wouldn't have to do that because I assumed it meant having to replace a section of vinyl siding on the house in order to get rid of the old vent hole.
 
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Old 03-25-15, 03:08 AM
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If your interested in side venting start a thread on that in appliances.
Switching off to http://www.doityourself.com/forum/el...rrow-area.html for venting thread.
 
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