electrical things on my mind this morning

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Old 04-12-15, 09:35 AM
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electrical things on my mind this morning

Between circuits 1 and 2 [pic]: Is there any real difference/advantage of doing one over the other?

A, B, & C => j-boxes
 
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Old 04-12-15, 09:47 AM
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Except for box fill which isn't probably significant no. You will need to use pigtails in 2-A assuming there is a third cable not shown that provides power.
 
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Old 04-13-15, 09:30 AM
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It looks like option 2 uses a little more wire, but there is really no difference from a practical point of view.
 
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Old 04-13-15, 10:02 PM
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So, to make sure I understand:

In example 2: Are A-B and A-C considered branch* circuits?


In example 1: Is A-B or B-C also considered a branch*?


* NEC terminology
 
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Old 04-14-15, 02:04 AM
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A "branch circuit" is from source (circuit breaker) through control devices (switches) to the load (motor, light, appliance) and back to the source. Individual parts of this circuit are not branch circuits.

Essentially there are three types of circuits; services, which are from the point of utility connection through the utility's meter and on to the first fuse or circuit breaker. Then there are feeders which are circuits from a service panel to an additional point of protection such as a sub-panel although that term does not exist in the National Electrical Code. Finally there are branch circuits which are from the last Overcurrent Protective Device (OCPD, fuse or circuit breaker) to the point of utilization such as an appliance, motor or light. Some branch circuits are "dedicated" which means they serve a specific load exclusively such as a kitchen range, an electric water heater, a furnace or other space heating device and several others. The rest of the branch circuits are for general usage and include receptacles and fixed lighting.
 
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