Wiring up my omga miter saw

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  #1  
Old 04-13-15, 10:24 AM
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Wiring up my omga miter saw

Can someone instruct me on how to hard wire up my omga miter saw.
there are 4 wires (black, Brown, Blue, yellow/green) and it looks like it was hard wired by last owner.

Pictures below show the 4 wires and the other picture shows the stats, like V 230/460, UPM 3400, A 3,32/1,6, CUS 0,89, HZ 60, HP 1,6, KW 1,18

I have a 220 and 110 outlets in my Garage
And Can I put a plug back on this miter saw and if so how and should it be 220 or 110.

I can do general wiring but I don't know what to do with the 4 (black, Brown, Blue, yellow/green) wires.

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  #2  
Old 04-13-15, 11:36 AM
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Have you used this saw in the US? That is obviously a European made machine and the voltages are not common US residential voltages. It MAY be a three-phase saw and if so then you are probably SOL as far as getting it running on standard US residential service.

I can tell you that the green/yellow wire is the equipment grounding conductor.

AND, you do not have "220 and 110 outlets" in your garage if you are living in the US. You would have 240 volts and 120 volts receptacles. Voltages in the US haven't been 220 or 110 for more than fifty years although many still use that terminology.
 
  #3  
Old 04-13-15, 01:16 PM
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Hmmm, odd combination of colors on that saw. The green/yellow is definitely the ground. By Euro three-phase standard the blue would be neutral and brown and black would both be hots, HOWEVER there should also be another hot which is clearly not there. If it's single phase, then why are there two hot colors? There should be only one. If it's following something other than Euro standard, then you have three hots implying three-phase HOWEVER the nameplate voltages are not common three-phase voltages outside of Europe.

Can you remove that cover (pictured under the nameplate) to access the wiring compartment and have a look at the internals of the saw? Perhaps we could help if we saw how this cord actually connects to the switch and motor.
 
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Old 04-13-15, 01:28 PM
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The saw says 60hz which would probably make it North American. Does the saw have a switch built in to it?

Company is US based. You might try contacting the company at http://www.omgainc.com/. Industrial saw so I'm leaning toward 3 phase. Do you have a model number for the saw not the motor? Any of the ones on this page? http://www.omgainc.com/productfamily.php?cid=2 The saws listed are all 3 phase with a $100 extra charge for single phase which seems to indicate the standard motor is 3phase.
 

Last edited by ray2047; 04-13-15 at 01:49 PM.
  #5  
Old 04-13-15, 02:19 PM
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Thanks for the replies- I don't know the correct terminology, thanks for straightening me out on that one.
I don't know the model #, it's no where written on the saw. It says it's a 1995/1 I'm guessing this saw is from 1995.

The shop that I bought it from was a woodworking cabinet maker here in the states, but it was sold through an auction so I have no way of asking anybody at that shop which is now closed down how they had it hard wired.

Here are 2 photos with the cover off
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  #6  
Old 04-13-15, 02:25 PM
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I'll have to do some research but I'm almost certain that IS a three-phase, wye-wound, 12 lead motor. If I am correct then you will need a phase converter to run it on single phase.
 
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Old 04-13-15, 02:35 PM
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What's a little confusing to me is why 6 of the leads are grouped together instead of two groups of 3, which would be typical of a dual voltage wye motor in the low voltage configuration. Otherwise, it all makes sense that this is a three-phase saw. Meaning you either need a phase converter or a commercial building.
 
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Old 04-13-15, 02:35 PM
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I think I will have to call in a electrician on this one and see what it is going to cost me to get a converter, this is out of my DIY electrical knowledge. Thanks everyone for the help.
 
  #9  
Old 04-13-15, 02:37 PM
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Not so fast, Ray. Since it is a 12 lead motor it is fairly easy to reconfigure the wiring to use a static phase converter. All that is really needed is a starting relay and a couple of capacitors.
 
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Old 04-13-15, 02:42 PM
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Furd, I have deleted my reply so as to not confuse the issue. Didn't think about static converter.
 

Last edited by ray2047; 04-13-15 at 03:12 PM.
  #11  
Old 04-13-15, 02:45 PM
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Ben, a standard dual voltage three-phase motor has six coils and they are wired in one of two standards, wye (also called star) and delta. Most lower horsepower motors are wye connected. Obviously the six coils need to be wired in series for the higher voltage and in parallel for the lower voltage. In a nine-lead motor you have three of the coils merging one end each in what is called the star point and this connection is internal to the motor. In a twelve-lead motor this star point is accessible and THIS is why the motor is wired in the manner seen.

I've done several conversions of three-phase motors to single phase by accessing the star point and adding both starting and running capacitors, the starting capacitor being taken out of the circuit by the actuation of a starting relay working off the back EMF. It really is a simple conversion and it retains the full rated horsepower of the motor. The only thing you lose is instant reversing which is irrelevant in a saw.
 
  #12  
Old 04-13-15, 03:00 PM
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David, you can do this yourself if you have a multimeter or even a simple continuity tester. I downloaded the picture and then rotated and enlarged it to get some more detail. It isn't sufficient but I did notice that it has Fiame Milano molded in the connection board. That means that it is of Italian descent, Milano being the Italian spelling of Milan, the opera city.

If you can determine the markings adjacent to each of the terminals it might help me to advise you further. Not a big deal if the terminal marking are nonsense as it is still easy to determine the proper US lead numbering system.
 
  #13  
Old 04-13-15, 03:51 PM
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I took the board off the motor to see what was behind it. It is pictured below
I also took a photo of the board close up and then labeled what I think I saw embossed in the plastic
All the labeling may not be exactly right as I would have to take the nuts off to see under some of them.

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  #14  
Old 04-13-15, 05:42 PM
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Where did you get this saw? The old owner may have some insight on how it was wired before.
 
  #15  
Old 04-13-15, 05:44 PM
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Tolyn, from an auction not the original owner.
 
  #16  
Old 04-13-15, 11:51 PM
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Those terminal designations are certainly not to US standards but that doesn't mean the US standard cannot be determined. A "good" motor shop could do the determination and they might even have a quality static phase converter that would work as well. The cost would likely be in the fifty to one hundred dollar range to just make the terminals correspond with the US standard and the phase converter another one to two hundred dollars.

I could figure it out with maybe a couple of missteps if I had the motor in front of me. I might be able to direct you into making the determination of US terminal designation and I know I could explain to you how to make the static phase converter but it would take a fair amount of back-and-forth communication.
 
  #17  
Old 04-14-15, 06:47 AM
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I will be taking it to a motor shop and see what they can do. Thanks everyone!
 
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