Adding Outlets to Garage

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  #1  
Old 04-18-15, 07:31 PM
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Adding Outlets to Garage

My garage is attached to my house. It currently has one outlet in the stupidest spot. I am looking to add more outlets to the garage, as well as better lighting. The house is back from the 1950's I would guess

I have a few questions I need some reassurance on though.

I know that every outlet in the garage needs to be GFCI protected, as well as the GDO supposedly.

The garage already has its own dedicated 12/2 run back to the main house panel. I will use this run for my outlets. The first outlet will be a GFCI, and then downstream the rest of the outlets. I plan to have 10 outlets on the wall plus the outlet to feed the GDO, not including the GFCI, so 12 in total.

Now I know their is no set limit on the # of outlets downstream, but I also don't want to introduce any false trips either. The GFCI I purchased doesn't specifically state the max # of outlets it will protect but theirs only 7 stickers that state GFCI controlled and 3 that state not grounded.

So I'm assuming the Manufacturer only recommends 7 outlets downstream, that still leaves me with 4 left.

1. Do I run the main circuit line to a junction box, one wire to the first GFCI and 6 downstreamed outlets. Then run another wire from the junction box to another GFCI where I left off, to get the next 5 so their ground protected?

2. Do I just use the one GFCI to power every outlet in the garage and buy extra stickers to meet code compliance?

3. Do I have to run another 12/2 cable back to the panel for the additional outlets?

3. Does the GDO need to me GFCI protected?

My biggest hurdle is making sure that all the outlets are ground protected. Not sure the best way to tackle it.

Lighting

I also went with 4' T8 Fluorescent lamp fixtures. They are the kind you plug in, not hardwired. I plan to install outlets in the ceiling just for the lights. Do these need to be GFCI protected, as its strictly for lighting purposes only? Or do they take into effect someone could plug something else into the outlets?

These light outlets will be controlled with a switch on the wall. Do I need to also make sure the ceiling outlets are TR (tamper resistant)?

I plan to have the basement lights and garage lights on the same circuit. its a 15A circuit, would this be allowed, or do I need to pull another 14/2 cable from the panel to run my garage lights. I plan to run 9 fixtures and each fixture is 64 watts.

I also plan to wire up 2 standard lights for entry purposes so you don't always have to run the big lights if your just grabbing a quick item or passing through.

Sorry for the long post. Just making sure I don't skip any steps or do something that isn't passable.
 
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  #2  
Old 04-18-15, 07:48 PM
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Hi, To start with, I'm not an electrician so I cannot answer all of your questions but, as far as the outlets in your garage, I would use a GFCI breaker to cover them all. That seems the simplest to me. As far as the lights, someone else will have to come in here and let us know what to do. Good luck with your project.
 
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Old 04-18-15, 08:16 PM
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Install a GFCI at the first receptacle and daisy chain the rest of the receptacles from the load side of the GFCI. You may run as many non-GFCI receptacles from the load side as you need.
I plan to have the basement lights and garage lights on the same circuit. its a 15A circuit, would this be allowed
Yes but but best to run a new circuit.

Terminology: Outlet is any place electric is tapped for use. Both receptacles and lights are outlets. Receptacles are female connection points where things are plugged in.
 

Last edited by ray2047; 04-19-15 at 05:43 AM.
  #4  
Old 04-19-15, 05:39 AM
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In addition, it seems you are under the impression GFCI's trip on overload. They trip on a differential between the hot and neutral, or a ground fault. Your breaker will trip on overload. The GDO must be GFCI protected. I would plan on at least one more circuit for lighting. Depending on your per receptacle planned load, adjust to an additional circuit if it seems it will exceed the 20 amps you now have.
 
  #5  
Old 04-19-15, 05:48 AM
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What do you plan on doing in this garage?
Reason I ask is I feel you would better off running a new 4 wire larger gauge wire and a small sub panel.
That way you could split up those circuits, have 220 avalible if needed and make it easier to run different amp. circuits.
 
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Old 04-19-15, 06:22 AM
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Joe's advice is the way to go. I would consider doing that before you start running your receptacles.

Run 10/3 with ground back to panel and you can install a 30amp sub panel.

You'll be glad you did, especially since your house was built in the 50's.
 
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Old 04-19-15, 06:46 AM
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I thought about doing a sub panel. Running either 10/3 or 8/3 off a double pole breaker from main panel.

I really don't plan on doing a lot. I don't see myself needing 240 as I don't use anything that requires it.

I just use simple power tools. Plan on having radio, battery chargers, and a few power tools running. IE. Small table saw. Skill saw. Miter box.

Also to plus in my daughters 12v car o charge it. Maybe a small battery charger for cars at times.

Basically just adding more outlets to have more options to plug stuff in as one isn't enough.

Then just lighting. Lighting will be on a 14/2 wire on the same circuit as basement lights. So I'd have just basement lights and garage lights on their own 15a circuit.
 
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Old 04-19-15, 11:38 AM
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I plan to install outlets in the ceiling just for the lights. Do these need to be GFCI protected, as its strictly for lighting purposes only?
ALL garage receptacles must be GFCI protected.
 
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