Wiring outets and switches in detached garage

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  #1  
Old 04-19-15, 10:10 AM
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Wiring outets and switches in detached garage

I am wiring outlets in a detached unheated garage. It will be installing drywall. Can I run the romex through the wall studs since it will have drywall?
Also, the lights or the entrance door (man door), can the switch for it be just inside the man door?

Thanks...
 
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Old 04-19-15, 10:43 AM
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The wiring thru the wall studs and then covered by sheetrock is fine. The switch for the lights usually goes near the door that gets the most use..... in your case.... the man door.
 
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Old 04-19-15, 01:17 PM
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Hole needs to be in the middle of the studs so you do not hit them when screwing up the drywall.
 
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Old 04-19-15, 06:44 PM
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Also, all receptacles need GFCI protection.
 
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Old 04-20-15, 02:28 AM
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So the GFCI breaker is the way to go?
 
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Old 04-20-15, 04:54 AM
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For a garage subpanel, ground fault circuit interrupters as breakers or as the first receptacle in each daisy chain is your choice.

With no subpanel, and just a 15 or 20 amp 120 only or 120/240 volt) circuit coming from the main house, a GFCI breaker in the main house has the disadvantage that if it trips then you have to walk back to the house to reset it.

(You're not allowed to have more than one circuit bringing power to the garage. If you are just getting started and laying the feed from the main house, we suggest #8 wire for 40 amps or even #6 gauge for 60 amps as futureproofing even if you don't install the garage subpanel yet and limit the circuit to 20 amps. All require separate ground and neutral and, for 240 volts, two hots.)
 
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Old 04-20-15, 07:08 PM
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So the GFCI breaker is the way to go?
A GFCI receptacle as the first receptacle on each circuit is a lot less expensive than just one GFCI breaker and provides the same protection.
 
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