GFCI multi-wire branch circuits

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Old 04-24-15, 10:46 AM
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Cool GFCI multi-wire branch circuits

Hello All! I'm new to this forum, as I am sort of new to DIY stuff. I've owned a fairly old house (110 y/o) for going on 4 years now, and I'm getting more and more into projects.

One area I know very little about (but have the most respect for) is Electricity. As a firefighter I know what it can do, and also as a firefighter I can't really afford to pay professionals to work on it all the time. So here's my question....

I have a GE Load Center with several breakers having what I believe is called multi-wire branch circuits (one 3 wire cable feeding two breakers?). My question is, can I replace just one of the two breakers with a GFCI or Afci/Gfci Dual Function Circuit Breaker?

Thanks in advance for your assistance!
Cheers!
 
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Old 04-24-15, 12:04 PM
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I have a GE Load Center with several breakers having what I believe is called multi-wire branch circuits (one 3 wire cable feeding two breakers?). My question is, can I replace just one of the two breakers with a GFCI or Afci/Gfci Dual Function Circuit Breaker?
No, the GFCI breaker will trip as soon as a load is applied on the other circuit. You could use a 2 pole GFCI breaker and replace both breakers though.
 
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Old 04-24-15, 12:35 PM
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Thank you!

I kind of figured, but the single GFCI is cheaper...2 Pole it is.

 
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Old 04-24-15, 01:41 PM
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Use a gfi receptacle at the point of use.
 
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Old 04-24-15, 01:48 PM
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Why are you wanting to change the breaker? Wouldn't a GFCI device work for your application?
(Bummer, PC beat me to it )
 
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Old 04-24-15, 02:20 PM
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Thank you! No reason not to do it that way I guess. Simpler, too. Thank you Gentlemen.
 
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Old 04-24-15, 04:51 PM
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If you use ground fault circuit interrupter receptacles on a multiwire branch circuit, each point of use needs its own GFCI receptacle with the load terminals left empty.

The continuing protected subcircuit from the load terminals of a GFCI receptacle cannot share the neutral of a 3 wire cable continuing to the next outlet box.

Now, you can run a new 2 conductor cable from the load terminals of the GFCI receptacle fed by a MWBC while the existing MWBC goes its own way via an existing continuing 3 conductor cable.
 
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Old 04-24-15, 06:55 PM
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Use a gfi receptacle at the point of use.
Yep, that's what I would do too.
 
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Old 04-24-15, 08:31 PM
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If you use ground fault circuit interrupter receptacles on a multiwire branch circuit, each point of use needs its own GFCI receptacle with the load terminals left empty.
I hear you, but would he not just need GFCIs at each outlet within range of requiring GFCI protection?
ex: 6 receptacles along a wall beside a sink, but only the first receptacle falls within range of needing protection. No need for protection on the other 5 right?
On the other hand, the breaker might be cheaper if he has many receptacles requiring protection.
 
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Old 04-25-15, 04:07 AM
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The NEC requires gfi protection for all countertop receptacles. This and the split wiring are two of the biggest differences I have noticed. We also do not count marrettes as box fill.
 
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