Order of electrical wiring from source to devices

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  #1  
Old 04-30-15, 08:16 PM
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Electrical Wiring from Source, to Receptacle, to Switch and Light???

Hi. Greetings to all.

I need to know if is possible or not to wire in this SPECIFIC order: Breaker Source - Receptacle - Switch - Light.

For example: Using a 14/2 Romex I want to know if I can wire (in the same circuit) from a 15Amp Breaker at the Load Center to a Receptacle, then to a Single Pole Switch and finally to the Light?

I know that if that circuit Breaker is turned off then the Light will not have power as the receptacle as well.

However, is this wiring order still possible or not?

Is there any possible consequences like power current drops at the Light when something is plugged in the receptacle, just because the receptacle being powered before the switch/light, or not???

Note: I do not want to have Power Source at the Light; and I do not want to use 3wire and ground cable, but 2wire and ground cable; so technically I am asking if is possible to Mix Receptacles and Switches in the same circuit BUT MORE SPECIFICALLY going from a Receptacle to a Switch and Light???

Thanks a lot.
 

Last edited by JosiQDIY2015; 04-30-15 at 08:32 PM. Reason: Spelling
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Old 04-30-15, 08:16 PM
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We ask that you post a topic in just one thread only so your other thread is no longer available.

Order is not really critical in a circuit.

Panel ---> receptacle ---> switch ---> light... will work just fine.
 
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Old 04-30-15, 08:23 PM
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I need to know if is possible or not to wire in this SPECIFIC order: Breaker Source - Receptacle - Switch - Light.
That is one common way of doing it. It is a way often used when adding a new light fixture but is also done in new construction.
I am asking if is possible to Mix Receptacles and Switches in the same circuit
Done all the time.

(ECHO... Echo... echo)
 
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Old 04-30-15, 08:47 PM
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Thanks for your fast replies.

Those are Good News. I did know that using 14/2 Romex circuits can be wire from Source to Single Pole Switch and Light, but I was unsure if a Receptacle can be between that Source and Switch.

I asked because I already did the Rough In of around 200ft of 14/2 Romex for around 4 separate circuits [(4) 15Amp Breakers], consisting each circuit of being wired from the Source to one or up to two Receptacles to a Single Pole Switch and a Light... but then I feel unsure about going directly from the receptacle to the switch...

...Good News is it can be done that way, because I didn't like the possibility to have to redo the Rough In, specially because I already cut and set the Wire Lenghts from the Load Center to all respectively electrical boxes in the circuits.

 

Last edited by JosiQDIY2015; 04-30-15 at 08:49 PM. Reason: Spelling
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Old 04-30-15, 08:56 PM
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Lightbulb

However, I should figured it was possible, because I found legitimate information about that GFCI Receptacles can be also wire to protect Switches (Not required by code BUT possible) using the LOAD to go to the desire to protect Switch instead of another Receptacle... I should noticed that it is actually the same principle I was asking about but without the GFCI protection.

 
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Old 05-01-15, 05:06 AM
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What areas are your 15 amp circuits serving?
 
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Old 05-01-15, 09:25 AM
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These are the 15Amp and 20Amp Circuits in my Wiring Project:

Hi pcboss,

Those four 15Amp circuits serve One Light in the Bedroom, One Light in the Bathroom, One Light in the Office at second floor, and One Light in the Living Room; however some of those circuits contains one or up to two receptacles (like in the Office) before the Switch and Light, BUT those 15Amp Receptacles are positioned just for the slightest use possible as charging a cellphone in the Office or in the Living Room...

However, I also wired additional circuits of 20Amp using 12/2 Romex (Yellow), for the next circuits: One circuit contains two GFCI Receptacles in the Kitchen and an additional 20Amp Receptacle protected by the GFCI LOAD for the Refrigerator. Another circuit contains a few Receptacles that will be use in the Living Room for a Big HDTV, Gaming Consoles, etc. Another circuit contains a few Receptacles that will be use in the Bedroom for another big HDTV, Gaming Consoles, Computer, etc... In other words I separated the receptacles that will have more load and use to 20Amp circuits, ONLY containing receptacles; while the Light Switches and Lights are separated in 15Amp circuits. The 15Amp curcuits will use 15Amp Breakers and the 20Amp circuits will use 20Amp Breakers respectively and accordingly to Code.

Finally I also have three additional DEDICATED CIRCUITS, one for the Water Heater consisting of a 30Amp GFCI circuit; one for the Air Conditioning consisting of a 20Amp Circuit; and one for an external WR Receptacle consisting of a 20Amp using 12/2 UF Cable and a Weather Resistant Box and Cover.

Those are the circuits.

My Load Center is a GE PowerMark Gold for up to 24 Circuits. With Cooper Bus Bars, and rated for 125AMPS. I am ONLY using GE Breakers as well.

Thanks a lot.

 

Last edited by JosiQDIY2015; 05-01-15 at 09:36 AM. Reason: Spelling
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Old 05-01-15, 06:02 PM
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One circuit contains two GFCI Receptacles in the Kitchen and an additional 20Amp Receptacle protected by the GFCI LOAD for the Refrigerator.
As you stated in your earlier post, a 20 amp receptacle is not necessary just because the circuit is 20 amps. Nor are 20 amp GFCI receptacles required.

one for the Water Heater consisting of a 30Amp GFCI circuit
I wouldn't use a GFCI breaker for a water heater.

With Cooper Bus Bars, and rated for 125AMPS.
What does Cooper busbars mean?
 
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Old 05-01-15, 09:55 PM
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Hi Casual Joe,

Yes you are right a 20Amp receptacle is not necessary just because a 20Amp circuit; actually that additional receptacle for the refrigerator is a 15Amp receptacle just that it will be wired in the same 20Amp circuit of the two 20Amp GFCI in the kitchen using the 12/2 wire. My wrong about not specifying that. However, the reason why the GFCI receptacles I will use in the Kitchen will consist of 20Amp is for personal preference; at least is to my knowledge that the Code requires them to be GFCI.

To be honest that second paragraph where you stated that you would not use a GFCI breaker for a water heater, I did not understand what you mean at all. Please provide a more comprehensive explanation about that argument.

Finally, with Cooper Bus Bars I mean that they are made entirely of Cooper; therefore they don't require the use of an Anti-Oxidant compound like with the Aluminum ones.

Thanks a lot.
 

Last edited by JosiQDIY2015; 05-01-15 at 09:57 PM. Reason: Spelling
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Old 05-01-15, 10:38 PM
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Cooper refers to a professional involved in the work of making utensils, casks, drum and barrels and other accessories, usually out of wood... Source: Wikipedia

Copper is a chemical element with symbol Cu... Source: Wikipedia
 
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Old 05-01-15, 10:55 PM
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Copper it is. A Copper Bus Bar (Buss Bar), entirely made of Copper.

English is not my Native Language.

Thanks a lot.
 
  #12  
Old 05-02-15, 06:20 AM
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Cooper is also a manufacture of electrical components and equipment which was recently bought by Eaton.
 
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Old 05-02-15, 08:02 AM
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That is the really big problem with spell checkers. Most do not warn you of sound-a-likes and similar spellings. Very bad if English is not you first language. Why modern spell checkers don't is beyond me and my bane.
English is not my Native Language
Your writing is better than some posters whose first language is English.
 
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Old 05-02-15, 09:38 AM
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Hi ray2047,

I did not use a Spell Checker. Typing Cooper instead of Copper was a spelling error 100% of my side. The reason why I write a good English (despite that is not my Native Language) is because since Middle School I started to watch Movies, Documentaries and Reading Books in English ONLY, then as I was improving I started to write in English A LOT, then I started to communicate with people writing in English more than in my Native Language. Currently, I have a Bachelor Degree, and a Graduate Master Certificate, for which I studied reading and writing ALL IN ENGLISH.

Nevertheless, I have been successful because personally I like and prefer English over my Native Language; and I do prefer it that way mainly because I learnt that reading and writing in English I has been capable of acquiring more Knowledge and Skills about every Science, etc.; that way I maintain my I.Q. Level optimized to high levels.

Thanks a lot.


Jos

 
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Old 05-02-15, 11:52 AM
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What no spell checker?! If I didn't use a spell checker my posts would be unintelligible.
 
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Old 05-02-15, 12:37 PM
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I never use Spell Checker for my casual Posts, comments and replies in any Forums.

I only use Spell Checker when I have to write extensive Assignments or Articles of up to 20 pages long in Microsoft Word, etc.


Thanks.
 
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Old 05-02-15, 12:45 PM
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Now back to the Electrical Wiring Project, I have other questions: Does an Electric Stove requires a 30Amp or a 50Amp circuit as a minimum requirement???

I am asking because I have 25feet of 10/2 Romex wire and a 30Amp Breaker ready to wire a dedicated circuit for an Electric Stove... However, I also have available a 50Amp Breaker but not the wire suitable for that amperage.

Is possible to use a 30Amp dedicated circuit for an Electric Stove at minimum or it requires to be a 50Amp circuit at minimum?

Note: For Electric Stove I mean an Electric Range with Full Size Oven.


Thanks a lot.
 

Last edited by JosiQDIY2015; 05-02-15 at 12:48 PM. Reason: Revised
  #18  
Old 05-02-15, 01:24 PM
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Except for specialty stoves 40 amp is bare minimum. Standard stoves are often 50-60 amps. If running a new circuit best practice even if the stove will work on 40 amps is to run a 60 amp circuit to future proof it.
 
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Old 05-02-15, 01:27 PM
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Update: The Eletric Range will be wired just like around 8 to 12 feet away from the Load Center, that means that will be a really short run circuit. That's why I am asking if I can go with a 30Amp circuit...

However, I just revised Frigidaire Specifications about my Electric Range and it says that a Minimum of 40Amp circuit is required.

I guess I will have to go with 50Amp because I already have the Breaker and just buy the proper size wire for that amperage that I think it is #6, right?

By the way, it needs to be a 6/3 or it can be a 6/2 wire???
 
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Old 05-02-15, 01:38 PM
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ray2047,

You are right. I will go with 50Amp then. I will not go over 50Amp as in my case the Electric Range will be in a very short run dedicated circuit, and we will barely use the Electric Range Oven after all.

Thanks for your replies.
 
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Old 05-02-15, 01:49 PM
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Yes, 6-3 NM-b (black, red, white, bare) will be good. It must be a 4-wire receptacle.
 
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Old 05-02-15, 02:07 PM
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ray2047,

Excellent. I will go with that Setup.

A 50Amp circuit with 6/3 wire, with the proper 4 wire Receptacle for the Electric Range plug and for the circuit required amperage.

Thank you a lot.

Jos
 
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Old 05-02-15, 04:00 PM
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Some ranges com with the ground and neutral tied together for older 3-wire cord set. If yours does follow the manufacturer's instructions for converting to a 4-wire cord set.
 
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Old 05-02-15, 06:07 PM
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I commend you on your command of English. Let us know how your project turns out.
 
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Old 05-02-15, 07:29 PM
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Finally, with Cooper Bus Bars I mean that they are made entirely of Cooper; therefore they don't require the use of an Anti-Oxidant compound like with the Aluminum ones.
Ok, you mean copper bus bars. Aluminum bus bars don't require antioxidant compound when installing a circuit breaker because aluminum bus bars are tin plated. The tin plating keeps them from oxidizing.
 
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Old 05-03-15, 02:34 PM
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CasualJoe,

I should be more specific, let me explain this to you...

General Electric have the Neutral and Ground Bus Bars made entirely of Copper; the NEUTRAL AND GROUND BUS BARS.

HOWEVER, other Brands Load Centers usually have the Neutral and Ground bars made of aluminum, and because you will install the White wires made of copper and the Ground bare wires made of copper to the Neutral and Ground Bars respectively, you will require an antioxidant for the Neutrals and Ground wires connected to the Neutral and Ground bars that are made of aluminum.

I guess that you are talking about the two legs in the panel where the Breaker will be connected to either one of two HOT aluminum legs (depending on single or double pole) consisting of 120Volts each leg in the panel... well, those two legs and the Breakers connections to the legs are made of aluminum so there you don't need any antioxidant.

Also, where you connect the Black Hot wires from the circuits to the Breakers the use of antioxidant is not required because the connections for the wires in the Breakers are made of copper.

I hope I explained it better this time.


Thanks a lot.
 
  #27  
Old 05-03-15, 03:04 PM
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Antioxidant paste is not required at the bus bars. You will not have issues without its use. The bars are listed for use with copper or aluminum.
 
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Old 05-03-15, 07:43 PM
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HOWEVER, other Brands Load Centers usually have the Neutral and Ground bars made of aluminum, and because you will install the White wires made of copper and the Ground bare wires made of copper to the Neutral and Ground Bars respectively, you will require an antioxidant for the Neutrals and Ground wires connected to the Neutral and Ground bars that are made of aluminum.
The ground and neutral bars you speak of that are aluminum are also tin plated and don't need nor require antioxidant.
 
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