Kitchen Wiring Check

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  #1  
Old 05-05-15, 05:17 PM
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Kitchen Wiring Check

I have a kitchen remodel happening, and just want to check my wiring against the forum.

1) Branch 1, 20 amps, 12 gauge: 2 GFCI receptacles in backsplash, and the gas range. Does the range need to be GFCI protected? Does it matter if the receptacles are sideways or vertical mounted?

2) Branch 2, 20 amps, 12 gauge: 3 GFCI receptacles in backsplash, and the fridge. Does the fridge need to be GFCI protected in this scenario? Or should I put the fridge on a standard receptacle, as a dedicated 15 amp circuit?

3) Microwave/hood combo, 20 amps, 12 gauge: This will be a dedicated circuit with an receptacle in the cabinet above the microwave. Does this need GFCI protection?

4) Dishwasher and Garbage disposal, 20 amps, 12 gauge: duplex GFCI receptacle mounted under sink, with a switch in back splash to control top outlet

5) Lights are all on their own 15 amp, 14 gauge circuit.

Thanks.
 
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Old 05-05-15, 06:06 PM
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The range nor the fridge is required to be GFCI protected unless the receptacle is also above the counter top.

For your two small appliance branch circuits (#1 and #2) You only need one GFCI receptacle for each branch circuit. Install it in the first outlet box and use the LINE and LOAD ports on the device to protect the rest of the circuit. Also you do not need to use 20 amp devices. This will save you a bunch of money.
4) Dishwasher and Garbage disposal, 20 amps, 12 gauge: duplex GFCI receptacle mounted under sink, with a switch in back splash to control top outlet
This does need to be GFCI protected, however you can not split wire a GFCI device. You will need to either install a GFCI elsewhere, or install a two gang box with two duplex receptacles and do the LINE/LOAD this I mentioned above.

3) Microwave/hood combo, 20 amps, 12 gauge: This will be a dedicated circuit with an receptacle in the cabinet above the microwave. Does this need GFCI protection?
Likely not, but I have had to with one inspector.

Most, if not all of these circuits will also need AFCI protection. Some breaker manufactures make combo AFCI/GFCI breakers.
 
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Old 05-05-15, 07:11 PM
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duplex GFCI receptacle mounted under sink, with a switch in back splash to control top outlet
You cannot control just one half of a GFCI receptacle with a switch. You can take power for the disposer from the load side of the GFCI receptacle to the switch, but you would also need another receptacle for the swiched power under the sink to plug the disposer into. I'd use a single or simplex receptacle. The dishwasher can just plug into the GFCI receptacle.

Depending on what code cycle you fall under, you may have to also AFCI protect these outlets like Tolyn said. Cutler-Hammer first came out with a dual function GFCI/AFCI breaker and now Square D also has their dual function breakers. Of course, if you use dual function breakers, you don't need the GFCI receptacle under the sink.

What code cycle is your AHJ on?
 
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Old 05-05-15, 09:04 PM
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I also believe Siemens also AFCI/GFCI combo breakers.
 
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Old 05-06-15, 08:39 AM
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Re:

Thanks for the quick feed back.

I will reduce the number of actual GFCI outlets on the branch circuits using the load option to protect other outlets. I have 15 amp devices with 20 amp passthrough rating, and the circuit will be 20 amps.

I do need to have AFCI, and plan to do that at the breaker. I just have a personal preference to try and keep the GFCI protection at the actual outlets so I don't have to run to the basement to reset if there's a trip

It's my understanding that a dishwasher and GD need to be on a dedicated circuit, which I interpret to mean that there are no available outlets to plug something else into that circuit, even if the outlet is hiding under the sink.

Is it possible run my 12/2 into the 'line" on a blank faced GFCI, and from there split a pigtail from the "load"; one to the bottom of a standard outlet, and one to the wall switch and then back to the top outlet, and neutrals both pigtailed back to the load on the GFCI?
 
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Old 05-06-15, 08:41 AM
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Is it possible run my 12/2 into the 'line" on a blank faced GFCI, and from there split a pigtail from the "load"; one to the bottom of a standard outlet, and one to the wall switch and then back to the top outlet, and neutrals both pigtailed back to the load on the GFCI?
Yes. .
 
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Old 05-06-15, 11:27 AM
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I also believe Siemens also AFCI/GFCI combo breakers.
I haven't seen them yet, but will keep my eyes open for them. If they didn't develop one, they'd be left in the dust as their major competitors have them. I guess GE will have to cough up a few bucks to try and compete.
 
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