Can I use extension cord w/ dryer?

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Old 05-05-15, 07:56 PM
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Can I use extension cord w/ dryer?

So the new dryer is two inches wider than the place it's supposed to fit into. The next-best spot is about 16 feet away from the 30 amp outlet. Can I put a 20' cord on the dryer? Or can I use a 30 amp-rated extension cord? Which would be safer/better?

I am so grateful for your help here, deep thanks!
 
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Old 05-05-15, 08:30 PM
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Is it a 220V dryer or 110?
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Old 05-05-15, 08:31 PM
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Dryers should not be used with extension cords.
 
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Old 05-05-15, 09:57 PM
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It's 220, 30 amp. I know I can use an extension cord on my 30 amp camper, so I was hoping a dryer wasn't so different.
 
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Old 05-05-15, 10:09 PM
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It's not any different. If you get the right gauge wire and plugs for your dryer, you can use an extension cord.

Mod Note: This posters advice is against the electrical code.
 

Last edited by pcboss; 05-06-15 at 05:13 AM.
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Old 05-05-15, 10:36 PM
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An extension cord is a temporary connection device.... you CAN NOT run your dryer on an extension cord.
 
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Old 05-05-15, 10:42 PM
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No you can't use an extension cord. They are for temporary use only not a substitute for building wiring. You also do not have 220 volts or 110 volts. Nominal voltage is either 120 or 240. Most electric dryers are actually 120/240 not 240.

The correct way to do this if it is a four prong receptacle is run 10-3 NMb or 4 single conductors in conduit. If it is a 3-prong plug though you probably don't have a ground and it can't be extended. You will need to run new cable.
I know I can use an extension cord on my 30 amp camper
30 amp camper extension cords are usually 120 volt and do not have the correct ends or number of conductors.
 
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Old 05-05-15, 10:49 PM
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I do not disagree with you PJMAX on the extension cord being temporary. Dryers do not come with power cords these days. If you can find the right gauge power cord pre-made or can make the power cord for the appliance using the proper gauge SO cord, then it is acceptable. IMHO.

Mod Note: the electrical code requires the receptacle to be installed near the point of use to eliminate the need for an extension cord.
 

Last edited by pcboss; 05-06-15 at 05:15 AM.
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Old 05-05-15, 10:56 PM
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By code.... a dryer needs to be connected to a receptacle with a UL approved power cord since it is an appliance. A do-it-yourself cord doesn't fit that description.
 
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Old 05-05-15, 11:01 PM
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Like I said, I don't disagree with you. I'm not an electrician and do not know the codes. I was just going by logic. IMHO. I've been wrong before many times.
 
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Old 05-06-15, 05:30 AM
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If you were remodeling the laundry room and the dryer was temporarily out of place then you may run it for a few cycles or a few days using an extension cord of adequate gauge. When the dryer is put in place then an extension cord may not be part of its connection to the power source.

You may replace the existing dryer receptacle with a junction box and four 10 gauge wires covered with Wiremold or in a flexible conduit to get to a new dryer receptacle at the intended dryer location.
 
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Old 05-06-15, 06:04 AM
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My office building, warehouse and factory get annual inspections from the fire dept. What they usually get me for is extension cords. They are not permitted... period. Even though the cord is UL listed and I used it for it's intended purpose extension cords are not permitted. Obviously a residence doesn't get inspected every year but it furthers the point that extension cords are not permitted. Just because it can be done doesn't make it legal according to code. If you decide to use an extension cord for your dryer and something happens your insurance company may use it as a reason to deny coverage.
 
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Old 05-06-15, 06:11 AM
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If it is a 4 wire circuit, it could likely be extended fairly easily even if the room is finished using a surface metal raceway.

@ Dane - Could you imagine the code violations found if homes were inspected once a year.
 
 

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