Wiring a shed


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Old 05-17-15, 10:06 PM
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Wiring a shed

Wiring a new shed I just put up. Very little working knowledge of household electric (120v), just want to make sure I'm doing it right.

Attached a few photos, power comes in the rear where you see junction box in corner, from there (going right) I am running 2 receptacles along the rear wall a GFCI accessible to exterior, and 1 along the right wall, (going forward) is 2 receptacles on the left wall, 1 GFCI accessible to exterior, and a switch above the door going to a receptacle on the ceiling.
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My question is this: do the standard outlets need to be independently grounded like GFCI's do? See pic of standard outlet, I ran both in/out ground connections to the outlet itself. The GFCI's I installed as the diagram shows. I already have the GFCI's tidied up with weather proof covers, or I would have taken pic.
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Wire I'm using is 12/3 solid metal clad, overkill I know, but I commonly 'over-do'. Aside from overhead lights, the only thing this structure is going to be powering is various battery chargers, a fan or two, an air compressor, and a leaf blower-all of which will only be used occasionally, but often at the same time.
 
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Old 05-17-15, 10:15 PM
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Also

Also, I know the power going to this structure shares part of another circuit in the house. Would adding a another breaker dedicated to my new shed be something I could do on my own?

My panel definitely had a few open slots lolName:  IMG_20150518_011230.jpg
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Old 05-17-15, 10:40 PM
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My question is this: do the standard outlets need to be independently grounded like GFCI's do?
All grounds need to be connected together and pigtailed to the receptacle and if the box is metal to the box also. If you are using metallic cable that has a bond strip not a ground wire you need to use metal boxes and connect a wire from the receptacle to the box unless the receptacle is self grounding.

Technically a ground is not required for a GFCI to function but current code requires it for safety.
 
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Old 05-18-15, 01:44 AM
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Your cable is not installed in a "workman-like" manner as required by code. That 45 degree run is especially bad. You can use 90 degree clamps to make it better.

The "handy" boxes are really too small if you have anything more than one cable and one device in the box. Using 4 inch square boxes with raised single-device covers is far better as it allows enough room for splices.

As Ray already pointed out the metal boxes need to be connected to the equipment grounding conductor.

Did you break the 12-3 into two 120 volt circuits? Is it connected to a two-pole circuit breaker in the house? Do you have a disconnect at the shed? How is the power run from the house to the shed? What kind of cable was used for this run?
 
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Old 05-18-15, 05:12 AM
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Also, I know the power going to this structure shares part of another circuit in the house. Would adding a another breaker dedicated to my new shed be something I could do on my own?
It would be best, especially since you have a compressor. As Furd asked what kind and size cable did you run to the shed?
 
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Old 05-18-15, 05:34 AM
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My panel definitely had a few open slots
I'd recommend you start saving to replace the old Federal Pacific panel. FPE equipment is no longer U.L. Listed.
 
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Old 05-18-15, 06:26 AM
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I would also recommend changing your device boxes to 4x4" boxes and use either industrial covers, or mud rings. I doubt the handy boxes you are using have the cubic inch space for the wires and devices. As a wise man once said: "Handy boxes are a misnomer, they are not handy for anything".

If you are only running one circuit you can protect the entire circuit with one GFCI device. You also need to install a disconnect in your shed.

The picture of the device you have wired is incorrect. You need to also pigtail a ground wire to the metal box with a green ground screw. The metal box needs to be bonded to the ground wire.

Make sure you wrap the wires around the screws in a clock-wise path.
 
 

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