Wiring sub-panel

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Old 05-21-15, 08:19 AM
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Wiring sub-panel

Hi all,

I am planning on wiring a sub-panel for a GFCI located in the yard.

The panel i'll be using is a Square D 70 amp panel Square D Homeline 70 Amp 2-Space 4-Circuit Indoor Flush Mount Main Lug Load Center with Cover-HOM24L70FCP - The Home Depot

This will be fed from a 20 amp breaker with 12/2 wire from the main panel. There will not be a second breaker added to the sub-panel so I don't think I need the 12/3 wire. This will be a 20 amp circuit with 20 amp breaker (in sub-panel) and 20 amp GFCI.

Can someone tell me if the following wire configuration is correct? Oddly there is no diagram provided with the panel.

Wire from main panel:
Hot wire to main feed in sub-panel
Neutral wire to neutral buss bar
Ground wire pigtails with ground wire to GFCI

Wire to GFCI:
Hot wire to 20 amp breaker in sub-panel
Neutral wire to neutral buss bar
Ground wire pigtails with ground wire from main panel

There is no ground bar in the sub-panel, so I figure the two grounds connect together. There is a green screw that when tightened, grounds the neutral buss bar with the panel housing. My main concern is the ground wire. I have the same setup for an existing GFCI with the grounds connecting together then attached to the panel mounting screw.

Any help would be appreciated!
 
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Old 05-21-15, 08:26 AM
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It would be much simpler to just put a GFCI receptacle or blank face device in a junction box on this run. The 20A GFCI breaker and panel is redundant when the whole run is 20A.

[ATTACH=CONFIG]50849[/ATTACH]
 
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Old 05-21-15, 08:38 AM
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That seems a heck of a lot easier, but I've already got everything installed and wired, just haven't made the final connection to the main panel. Is redundancy a bad thing with electrical work, or just a waste of money?
 
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Old 05-21-15, 08:57 AM
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The indoor panel cannot be used outside in the yard.
 
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Old 05-21-15, 09:06 AM
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The panel is located indoors.
 
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Old 05-21-15, 09:19 AM
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But as previously asked by Ben why do you need a panel?
 
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Old 05-21-15, 09:29 AM
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This is how the existing GFCI is wired (located in the yard with wiring buried in conduit). I also read that it is recommended to add a panel when running electrical underground.. so I figured it was proper (even if only in the past). I am installing actually two sub-panels. The second 20 amp circuit goes to a pool timer then to the pool GFCI.
 
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Old 05-21-15, 11:23 AM
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I also read that it is recommended to add a panel when running electrical underground
BS courtesy of the uninformed on the internet. Absolutely not needed even if you need two 20 amp circuits. If you need two circuits just use a miltiwire circuit.
 
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Old 05-21-15, 12:45 PM
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Ok, should I eliminate the panel for the pool pump as well, and just have the timer fed directly from the main panel?
 
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Old 05-21-15, 02:56 PM
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Ok, should I eliminate the panel for the pool pump as well, and just have the timer fed directly from the main panel?
Yes. Do you mean a GFCI receptacle? If so what is its purpose?*

Note if the other receptacle is in the same direction as the pool receptacle then you could just run 12-3 to the first GFCI receptacle and run 12-2 to the second receptacle*.

*If the receptacle at the pool is for the pool not general use cable may not be allowed because you need an insulated ground. You would need conduit and individual conductors to the pool.
 

Last edited by ray2047; 05-22-15 at 11:15 AM. Reason: Clarify my response.
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Old 05-22-15, 06:56 AM
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A cable with a bare ground cannot be used outside for a pool or spa. UF cannot be used for the pool equipment.
 
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