Power to shed via extension cord

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  #1  
Old 05-22-15, 07:04 PM
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Power to shed via extension cord

I have power running to my shed via an extension cord that starts in an outdoor outlet on my house and ends at a power strip in my garage. Note: This extension cord is only plugged in when I am working in the shed. Its always unplugged when not in use. Safety first. I found similar thread below but it is to old to reply to. http://www.doityourself.com/forum/el...et-outlet.html.

I would like to add an inlet plug like the OP of that thread asked about. One person suggested a Leviton 4937 weatherproof plate. I am trying to located a weatherproof box version of this plug, similar to this box

Does one exist?
 
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  #2  
Old 05-22-15, 08:56 PM
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I found similar thread below but it is to old to reply to. ''Power to shed via extension cord, inlet, outlet''. I would like to add an inlet plug like the OP of that thread asked about.


Oh boy, last time a Thread containing that question was started, back then in 2012... the replies turned quite... odd and bizarre...

http://www.doityourself.com/forum/el...sion-cord.html ... ...


... a few replies later things at the Post were like ...

...then at the final replies things at the Post turned like... GI2




--- Please accept a little of sane Humor, all of you.


Jos
 

Last edited by JosiQDIY2015; 05-22-15 at 10:29 PM.
  #3  
Old 05-23-15, 06:54 AM
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While protection from the weather is paramount, and the "in-use" cover will help, exposing an extension cord to weather is less than ideal. If you plan on using the shop for a long time (years), I would go ahead and do it right and run a circuit out there from your panel.
 
  #4  
Old 05-23-15, 08:26 AM
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The extension cord will only be exposed/used when I actually need a power source. It will not be permanently connected. I cannot run a circuit from my main panel without replacing the entire panel (more circuits). I do plan on doing this in the future, but for the next year or so I need to use the extension cord method.
 
  #5  
Old 05-23-15, 08:33 AM
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I cannot run a circuit from my main panel without replacing the entire panel (more circuits).
Can you not add a small sub-panel or perhaps use tandem circuit breakers? Post a few pictures of the existing panel showing the label on the door and the space around the panel.

Even running the conduit or UF cable to the shed back to the vicinity of the panel and then transitioning to a type SO cord with plug would be better than using an extension cord the entire run. This could be done in a manner that would be fully compatible with a new service panel when that time comes.
 
  #6  
Old 05-23-15, 11:41 AM
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Hi toolmonkey,

I totally agree with Furd's recommendations.

You may want to verify if you can use a Tandem Breaker at your Main Panel, that way you will be able to have two separated circuits (an existing one and an additional one to power your shed) but using the same 1'' inch space of one of your current circuits.

In my opinion, it's always better to add at least one dedicated circuit to your shed instead of repetitively use an extension cord in order to avoid any possible damage trough time to the extension cord and to avoid any possible risks that may emerge with time and usage.

If money is currently an issue, just buy a 20Amp or 30Amp Tandem Breaker (around $10 bucks) and 12/2 (for 20Amp) or 10/2 (for 30Amp) UF-B (Underground Feeder) for Burial Cable 50feet long (around $100 bucks or less, assuming your shed location is at or under 50feet from Main Panel); then at the Shed you can use the SO Cord Furd recommended to you. You can complete the job with just around or less than $125 to $150 but definitely with less than $200.

Said that, definitely a dedicated 20Amp or 30Amp circuit seems to be more than enough to supply your current electrical necessities on your shed, and you will never have to worry about any damage or potential risks you may face through time using an extension cord to power your shed.


Please let us know if you decide to go with the Tandem Breaker and UF Cable Setup, we will be more than pleased to help you in any further doubts or questions that you may have while doing the electrical installation to properly and safety power your shed.


Good Luck.


Jos
 
  #7  
Old 05-23-15, 11:49 AM
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Said that, definitely a dedicated 20Amp or 30Amp circuit seems to be more than enough to supply your current electrical necessities
But a 30 amp feed would require a subpanel and other complications so staying with a 12-2 20 amp feed is best given this particular situation.
 
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Old 05-23-15, 11:49 AM
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Thanks for the suggestions. I have a coworker that use to have an electrician business, so I'm going to speak to him about the tandem circuit. He may even be able to do the work for me. My shed is only about 15 feet from my main panel, so that's a plus.

Regarding how many amps, the power tools I have are: miter saw, circular saw, table saw, and other small tools. I also have (3) LED workshop lights for lighting. More is better but would 20amp work fine for this?
 
  #9  
Old 05-23-15, 11:52 AM
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See my post above yours. You were posting as I was writing.
 
  #10  
Old 05-23-15, 11:53 AM
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Thanks. I also edited my post with some more info.
 
  #11  
Old 05-23-15, 12:06 PM
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would 20amp work fine for this
It should but you might want to consider a 20 amp multiwire circuit. That will give you two 20 amp circuits without needing a subpanel but will require two spaces in your panel. If you panel takes tandems though and has none now that shouldn't be a problem.

A multiwire circuit would use 12-3 instead of 12-2 and be connected to either a 2-pole 240 breaker or two full size single pole (120) breakers handle tied.

Please tell us the make and model number of your panel and we can go from there.
 
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Old 05-23-15, 12:07 PM
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toolmonkey,

How many Amps use your Miter Saw, Circular Saw and Table Saw? It's very likely that you will not be able to use more than one at the same time. However, even using one at a time what is the Amperage of each of those power tools?
 
  #13  
Old 05-23-15, 12:17 PM
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But a 30 amp feed would require a subpanel and other complications
ray2047,

May you quote to me where the NEC states that a 30Amp Feed would require a Subpanel and which are those other complications?

I need the information to be able to learn more.


Thank you a lot.


Jos
 
  #14  
Old 05-23-15, 12:28 PM
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Jos, I'm too lazy to look it up even though my NEC is less than eighteen inches away BUT the NEC prohibits any general purpose lighting or appliance circuit (any circuit that is not dedicated to a single appliance) larger than 20 amperes. What that means is the largest size circuit to a convenience receptacle or lighting fixture is, by default, 20 amperes. That is why a sub-panel would be necessary.
 
  #15  
Old 05-23-15, 12:34 PM
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Understood.

Thanks.


----

Jos
 
  #16  
Old 05-23-15, 12:49 PM
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Name:  main-panel.jpg
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Size:  34.4 KBName:  main-panel-label.jpg
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Size:  51.4 KB

I am unable to locate a model number on the door or inner panel. Would it be located inside where the breakers are connected? See attached label and layout.
 
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  #17  
Old 05-23-15, 12:56 PM
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Post a picture of the entire label, the needed information is most likely on the right side of the label.
 
  #18  
Old 05-23-15, 02:05 PM
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May you quote to me where the NEC states that a 30Amp Feed would require a Subpanel and which are those other complications?
Josi, in addition to Furd's answer receptacles for 120 general purpose are only rated for 20 amps maximum.

A subpanel would require a ground rod. If you used it as a 120v only subpanel given the lack of easy availability of 120 subpanels you'd probably have to use a standard 120/240 subpanel. To use more than half the slots would require modification of the panel. Easier to run 120/240 to it but now you are running four wires not three to it.
 
  #19  
Old 05-23-15, 02:15 PM
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Josi, in addition to Furd's answer receptacles for 120 general purpose are only rated for 20 amps maximum.
ray2047, You definitely gave me a Checkmate on that one; I completely missed that basic aspect.


Thanks a lot.


Jos
 

Last edited by JosiQDIY2015; 05-23-15 at 03:24 PM.
  #20  
Old 05-31-15, 08:45 AM
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Sorry it took so long to get respond, I've been out of town. Here is a photo of the entire label.

Name:  main-panel-full_label-e.jpg
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Size:  45.3 KB

EDIT:

Here is a link to the full size photo
http://i60.************/uq3dc.jpg
 
  #21  
Old 05-31-15, 11:35 AM
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Tinypics won't work as a link. You may be able to post it on photobucket, etc. Maybe Ray can make it big.
 
  #22  
Old 05-31-15, 12:50 PM
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Tried to enlarge it but just not high enough resolution. If you can just post the model number we can go from there. Example: BR2024H100.
 
  #23  
Old 05-31-15, 02:10 PM
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Lets try this again. Looks like the forum wont allow TinyPics. Here is an Imugr link

http://i.imgur.com/yLM4goL.jpg
 
  #24  
Old 05-31-15, 09:27 PM
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It appears that panel does not accept "tandem" circuit breakers. The only alternative is to install a "sub-panel" next to it and transfer a few circuits to free up two spaces for a double-pole circuit breaker to feed the sub-panel.

This is commonly done when the number of circuit breakers need to be expanded beyond what the original panel will hold.
 
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