Sub panels not allowed ?

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  #1  
Old 05-22-15, 07:43 PM
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Sub panels not allowed ?

I have to cabins 1 for me an the wife the other for our special needs boy so that he has a sense of independence. I was going to run 200 amps to my mine then a sub panel to his and my lil wood shop but the electrical company does not allow that they said I need to set a junction box out side then go to the 3 panels. I have never herd or seen this done what would I need for the junction box?
 
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Old 05-22-15, 07:50 PM
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Normally the power company has no say about what happens after the meter. Nothing in your plans sounds out of the ordinary. I don't see the objection.
 
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Old 05-22-15, 08:06 PM
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They don't allow you to run power into one building then out to another for a sub panel
 
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Old 05-22-15, 08:32 PM
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Talk to the local building dept.
 
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Old 05-22-15, 08:53 PM
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I still don't see how they have any say after the service. That falls under the NEC.
 
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Old 05-22-15, 08:58 PM
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Just a guess but maybe the the Poco rep that said that thought they were separate residence instead of part of one residence.
 
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Old 05-22-15, 10:23 PM
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This doesn't make sense. Did they say anything about meters and where they would be located/required?

As Pulpo said, a trip to the building department might be in order here.

My guess is they are concerned with Ground Current.
 
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Old 05-23-15, 07:06 AM
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The meter is going on the pole 350 ' from the corner of the shop with the cabins in front of the shop like 20' from the same corner
 
  #9  
Old 05-23-15, 07:28 AM
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The term "sub-panel" does not exist in the National Electrical Code but the meaning of the term is well understood. Generally, the authority and concern of the electric utility stops at the meter and anything beyond is the under the purview of the local building department. This "local" authority could be at a town, city, county or state level and may include all sections of the NEC or it may add to or delete from the NEC. Consequently, in this specific case it should NOT be the utility that is making the ruling but the local building and/or electrical authority. While I cannot think of any particular case where such an arrangement as you describe would be "unlawful" it absolutely could be if your local authority enacted that ban into law when they adopted the NEC, with changes, into local law.
The meter is going on the pole 350 ' from the corner of the shop with the cabins in front of the shop like 20' from the same corner
Now this additional information adds some specifics that while not really addressed by the NEC, nor being of particular interest to the serving utility, DOES influence the design of the system. Assuming that 100 amperes is the maximum design load and that the service will be at 240/120 volts single phase you would need 3/0 aluminum conductors to supply the shop with a voltage drop of about 3% or a terminal voltage of 232 volts under maximum load. For "cabins" and a smallish, one-man shop this should be sufficient.

One thing that the local jurisdiction may be requiring is that you have a fused (or circuit breaker) disconnect at the meter and this, in turn would make ALL the panels downstream "sub-panels"; requiring separation of neutral and equipment grounding conductors, grounding electrodes (rods) at each building and four-wire runs from/to everything beyond the meter. There would be no need to run power through an additional circuit breaker in one panel and then on to the next as long as wire of a size required for the maximum amperage was used to each panel. In other words, you would run the 3/0 to the first panel, which would have "feed-through" lugs and then no less than #1 (#1/0 better in my opinion) to the next panel and so forth. Each panel would need to have a main circuit breaker or not be able to supply more than six individual circuits.
 
  #10  
Old 05-23-15, 10:00 AM
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I'm running 4/0 4/0 2/0 urd from the meter to the first 200 amp main panel. That was the plan anyway
 
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Old 05-23-15, 10:16 AM
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If you have a disconnect at the pole you will need 4 conductors to the other panels.
 
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