New shed light and receptacle.

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Old 05-25-15, 08:49 PM
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New shed light and receptacle.

I am new to the forum and need electrical wiring help for my new shed please. I love doing things myself so I can learn and, although I am quite handy, I have never done electrical work before. I have asked a couple of electricians for quotes but just can't afford it right now so I have decided to do it myself.....what better way to learn and be proud of your DIY work right? As long as I don't electrocute myself then things will be fine.........

Anyways I built a 12' x 16' shed this last fall (pictures to be attached shortly). This will be just for storage so I can clear up my garage and an occasional DIY project. The shed also has a loft. I would like to supply lighting to both the shed main floor and the loft (two different light switches). I would also like to apply about 4-6 electrical outlets on the main shed floor as well.

When I built my house I had the electrician pull a 60-amp power outage to the outside. I would like your guys' help to:

1. Pull wire from the 60-amp power outage to a subpanel in the shed.

2. Pull wires from subpanel to light switches and electrical outlets.

3. Pull wires from light fixtures to light switches.

You guys are probably laughing by now. I am determined to learn about electricity and I hope you guys can help.
 
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Old 05-25-15, 08:52 PM
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I will attach pictures and distance measurements as well as the types of light fixtures and electrical outlet boxes soon.

Again, I am brand new to electrical work so (1) please don't laugh and (2) please speak in simple english.
 
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Old 05-25-15, 09:11 PM
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Welcome to the best DIY forum on the Internet! No one is going to laugh.

Learning by doing is an excellent way to get an education but you need a few building blocks first. At this point in the game you don't even know which questions to ask. I strongly urge you to purchase the book Wiring Simplified and read it cover to cover before attempting any electrical work. Wiring Simplified is the layman's bible for electrical work. It not only tells you HOW to do it but WHY it is done in the manner prescribed. Wiring Simplified has been in continuous print for more than fifty years and is revised every three years to coincide with revisions to the National Electrical Code (NEC). You will learn how electricity is generated, transported and distributed to our homes,stores and factories. You will learn of the evolution of safety devices and you will learn (in simple arithmetic) how to make calculations for simple projects.

The writing is done in a manner that no prior experience is needed to understand. Best of all, it is an inexpensive book, usually less than ten dollars at the local big box home improvement mega-mart. It is usually found in the electrical aisles and NOT in the books and magazines section. Wiring Simplified is also available from many on-line booksellers as well as the better neighborhood hardware stores. It is not a huge book, maybe 6 inches by 8 inches and about 120 -150 pages with lots of illustrations.
 
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Old 05-25-15, 09:40 PM
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1. Pull wire from the 60-amp power outage to a subpanel in the shed.
Don't have a clue what a "power outage" is in this context but a subpanel is over kill by a big factor. All you need is a single 20 amp feed from your breaker box using either #12 UF-b direct burial cable or conduit with individual conductors (wires).
 
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Old 05-25-15, 09:57 PM
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Hi Lammikin,

I definitely agree with Furd's advice. I will make echo to Furd's words and will also suggest that you buy and start reading the exact book he recommended to you.

Always remember that electrical wiring and any electrical project involves plenty of potential risks; also remember that everything needs to be wired, installed, etc. according to the National Electrical Code (this is not optional in the States, is Law); I will definitely suggest that you start reading the book first, that way you will become more familiar with basic electrical terms, procedures, requirements, wiring diagrams, etc. before performing any electrical work on your own.

However, don't be shy to continue asking anything you want, feel free to make any new question(s) that may emerge to you and we will be of course in the best disposition to answer all your questions.


Thank you a lot.


Jos
 
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Old 05-25-15, 11:52 PM
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Thanks guys. I will definitely stop by a few hardware stores as well as Barnes & Noble tomorrow to see if I can grab a copy of Wiring Simplified. At least I am heading in the right direction. I am determined to do this myself so any feedback is greatly appreciated. It's time I learn a little about electrical work.
 
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Old 05-26-15, 01:34 AM
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One of the things I like about electricity, at least the theory, is that it is totally logical. There is no guess work, it either works or it doesn't. All the code requirements are for safety; safety of personnel and safety of the structure. It isn't rocket science and it is an equal opportunity killer but treat it with respect and you will have no problems.

I've been playing with electricity since I was five years old, maybe younger. My mother, may she rest in peace, would tell the story of my dragging an unguarded light bulb around and every so often plugging it in to see if it still worked. Of course she told a lot of lies in day as well. Truth is, the bulb did have a guard and it was a six volt bulb. I had a "hot shot" battery that I connected it to for operation.

Still, I've worked with or around everything from millivolts to 26,000 volts (I worked a couple of years in a power generation station) and I'm still not dead. Never, ever forget that it takes only the tiniest amount of electricity to kill you if you let your guard down.
 
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Old 05-26-15, 10:48 AM
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Just ordered Wiring Simplified 44th Edition and Wiring Complete: Expert Advice from Start To Finish (Taunton's Complete). Hopefully these books will give me enough knowledge to wire lighting and receptacles in my shed. Thanks for all your guys' feedback......I'll Be Back.........
 
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Old 05-26-15, 04:09 PM
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While waiting for the book to arrive in the mail, check your 60 amp power feed. It will need to have at least three #6 gauge copper conductors for use as two hot wires and a neutral and one #10 gauge copper conductor for a ground at the very least.

The shed feed can be "temporarily" hooked up to a double 20 amp breaker at the house panel and no subpanel would be needed in the shed for the time being.
 
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Old 05-26-15, 04:14 PM
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It is not unusual for a 12 x 16 shed to develop into a workshop that draws upwards of 30 amps at 240 volts.
 
 

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