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Type of contractor needed to connect my DSL demarcation point to a phone jack?

Type of contractor needed to connect my DSL demarcation point to a phone jack?

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  #1  
Old 05-26-15, 11:39 AM
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Exclamation Type of contractor needed to connect my DSL demarcation point to a phone jack?

Hi guys,

Hopefully this is the right forum to be asking this.

We just moved to a new Canadian town, and we're trying to get our DSL Internet set up (dry loop).

I was able to confirm that the DSL works by plugging my modem directly into the demarcation point (pictured here). But now we need to connect the demarcation point to one of our phone jacks. Basically, the DSL line needs to be connect to at least one of our phone jacks.

Strangely, our ISP (Teksavvy) is telling me that they can't do this for us since it's "private property' matter (lol what?).

I don't know what kind of contractor is needed to hire to get this done. I've called several Electricians in our area, and none of them offer this kind of service. Even my ISP (Teksavvy) doesn't seem to know what contractor I need to contact to run a DSL line through our house.

Any thoughts? Better yet, is it possible to do DIY this sort of thing? I've been without Internet for several days, and it's starting to drive me nuts!
 
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  #2  
Old 05-26-15, 12:12 PM
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Assuming you have a phone number and DSL. Is the phone line active inside the house ?

If it is... then you already have DSL inside there.
 
  #3  
Old 05-26-15, 12:44 PM
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My phone co says that anything on my side of the demark box is my problem. I have pulled a few added extensions. No problem, just mind the color codes.
 
  #4  
Old 05-26-15, 01:13 PM
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A low voltage or telephone contractor should be able to do this. If you want to run a Cat 5 cable you could do it yourself.
 
  #5  
Old 05-26-15, 01:24 PM
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My phone co says that anything on my side of the demark box is my problem. I have pulled a few added extensions. No problem, just mind the color codes.
If you can do this you can do your own DSL line also. It's the same thing just make sure you use the right type of cable and watch the color codes. It's actually very simple.
 
  #6  
Old 05-26-15, 01:35 PM
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In checking further... Teksavvy is only a provider of services. You must have a wireline company there too. Someone who is the actual service provider.
 
  #7  
Old 05-26-15, 02:32 PM
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PJ Max: You're correct. Bell Canada is the actual service provider. But the problem is they won't do the wiring unless I sign up with them (which I won't do. They're really frustrating to deal with). And unfortunately we do not have a landline. We rely 100% on our mobile phones.

pcboss: I'd be okay with doing it myself, but I have no idea where to begin. What kind of cables do I need? And do I need to bore a hole through my exterior brick wall? And what happens after that?

goldstar: Teksavvy told me the exact same thing. But like I was explaining to pcboss- I have no idea where to begin with the wiring process. Any tips?

There's a bunch of phone lines in [our fuse box area](http://i.imgur.com/xpjLuO5.jpg). I'm pretty sure that this is where the previous homeowner had their Internet setup. Is there some sort of device that I need to buy to just hook up all of the wires and make all of the connecting jacks work with our DSL connection?
 

Last edited by melon cat; 05-26-15 at 03:02 PM.
  #8  
Old 05-26-15, 05:16 PM
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You have to be signed with Bell Canada.... they are the service provider. They own the lines. Usually you pay them and they pay the ISP but that is of no importance here.

In the picture I highlighted a blue-blue/white pair. It is already in your house and should be usable for your DSL. You need to find the four pair cable that comes into the house. I don't see it in the panel picture.

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  #9  
Old 05-26-15, 05:34 PM
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PJmax, not in Canada. If you sign with a non-wireline provider, they contract with Bell Canada, Rogers Cable, or other incumbent for the last mile.

Normally a Teksavvy install should include the install up to the DSL splitter after the dmarc. I have this configuration with a dry loop and the Bell Tech installed it on behalf of Teksavvy.

I would suggest you post on dslreports.com in the Teksavvy direct forum and one of their support staff should sort this out quickly.
 
  #10  
Old 05-26-15, 05:42 PM
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Thanks for the clarifications there.
 
  #11  
Old 05-26-15, 10:42 PM
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You could do this yourself very easily.
The cable on the left, find the other end of it inside your house.
-Once located, you will need to install a pots splitter. http://www.ckeynetworks.com/images/P...20Splitter.jpg
-You won't find a pots splitter at Home Depot, you will need to talk your provider into giving you one, or buy one at an electrical wholesaler. I'm not sure where you are from but try Eecol, Choice Electric, Graybar, or Wesco.
-Once you have the splitter mounted, put the blue/white wire from outside under the R terminal where it says "line" on your splitter. Place the white/blue wire under the T terminal.
-The pot splitter is basically separating your phone signals from your internet signals. Your cables beside your panels are terminated so I think its a safe assumption that the previous owner had their modem installed there. Those terminated cables will plug in to your modem and likely feed jacks around the house. Best thing to do would be install your modem there.
-If your modem will be located near the splitter, you can simply use a standard phone cord and plug it into the "modem" slot on your splitter, then into your modem. You then plug those terminated cables into your modem and you should be ready to get back online!
-If you have landline phone, you take a length of cat5 cable and run the blue pair from the R and T terminals on the "phone" part of the splitter to a phone block. Product Details : Termination Block, 1 in 5 Out
Your phone jacks will run out of the block.
- If you have a monitored security system, let me know and I will explain how to wire that into the splitter.

Any questions, check back here and we'll help you out!
 
  #12  
Old 05-27-15, 07:16 PM
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Thanks for that really detailed write-up, Mr.Awesome.

But here's something interesting. It looks like I do have a POTS Splitter next to the fuse panel:



But here's something else. The wires seem to be connected to the 'Telephone' terminal. If I disconnect them from the Telephone terminal and re-attach them to the 'DSL Modem' terminal, would that fix my problem? The zoomed-in photo below shows what the splitter looks like as of right now.



EDIT: Picture of my phone jack wall outlet, if it helps:
 

Last edited by melon cat; 05-27-15 at 08:55 PM.
  #13  
Old 05-27-15, 07:32 PM
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That device will work for you but it's not connected. I circled all your phone lines in pink. You must have jacks all over the house. I pointed a white arrow at what looks like the cable coming in from the outside box.

The blue and blue/white pair connects to the line terminals. Then you will need to determine which jack in the house you want to use and connect that cable, using the same blue and blue/white wires to the DSL modem port.

If you look at the wiring to the left...... you'll notice that all the blues and blue/whites are joined in a splice and covered with gray jacket. That means that the blue and blue/white from outside is already being sent to all your jacks in your house.

Have you tried connecting your modem to any of the jacks in the house ?

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  #14  
Old 05-28-15, 07:35 AM
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As PJ said, incoming cable still needs the blue pair to "line".
You could then hook your cable wad up to "phone" if you like, but I would separate them into a block to clean it up.
You could use one of those phone jack for your modem, but you still need ethernet jacks plugged in to your modem for a hardwired internet connection, which I'm confident those blue cables are meant for. Not having jacks plugged in to your modem means you`re strictly running on wireless.
 
  #15  
Old 05-28-15, 07:53 AM
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Hey guys,

I tried my best to re-wire based on your instructions. But, still no DSL connection. New config:



What am I doing wrong? I even tried to switch the white with the blue-white, but still nothing. I feel like I'm not following your directions properly.

And PJmax- yes, I have tried to connect the modem to every wall jack in the house. None of them gave me DSL connectivity, unfortunately.
 
  #16  
Old 05-28-15, 08:14 AM
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You had service at the demarc point and it looks like the blue/white pair is connected correctly outside and if you are using the blue/white pair that comes out of the heavy black cable then you are correct inside.

The only thing I can't confirm is that the signal is actually leaving the demarc block. I'm not familiar with that block. Is there any manufacturer name on it with a model ?

Ours here would have a short jumper cable that plugged into the jack outside.
Maybe Mr.A can shed some light on it.
 
  #17  
Old 05-28-15, 08:58 AM
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That's the same block that Bell Canada installed for my Teksavvy dry loop.

The DSL splitter appears to be wired correctly - you can use either the wire pins on the left or the RJ12 for the connections.

Are the blue/white pair from the feed attached to the NID? Can you tone them out to check continuity?
 
  #18  
Old 05-28-15, 09:35 AM
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Well, this is interesting.

It looks like I connected the "wrong" blue and white-blue wires. The ones I originally connected were much thinner, and didn't get me any DSL connectivity. But there were some thicker, similarly-coloured wires wrapped in electrical tape. I tried those ones instead, and they worked!



But now, the modem only works when plugged directly into the POTS Splitter. Still can't plug it into our main floor's wall jack, for some reason. But, hey. Internet!
 
  #19  
Old 05-28-15, 10:14 AM
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That's exactly what the DSL splitter is supposed to do - it filters out the DSL signal on the pair connected to phone.

If you have a pair that goes directly to the jack that you want to plug the modem in, you can connect it to the terminal block where it says DSL Modem.
 
  #20  
Old 05-28-15, 03:49 PM
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PJ,
I'm not a telco guy, I self taught myself all this stuff so I'm no expert on the components inside the NID.

melon,
Nicely done, be sure to let Bell know an amateur did their job for them.
To elaborate on what fin said... I assume you're trying to install your modem on the main floor and you're fine with a wireless connection?
-You will need to locate the cable downstairs feeding your wall jack of choice.
-At the jack, hook your wires up according to color. Red wire to red terminal etc.
-At the splitter, place the red wire under the R terminal where it says "dsl modem" and green under the T terminal.
-Now try plugging your modem in to the jack upstairs.
-Take a short length of cable and place the red wire under the R terminal where it says "phone" on the splitter and green on the T terminal. Then you may joint the other end to your landline bundle, reds to reds greens to greens. This will leave you set up for landline service should you ever choose to get it.
 
  #21  
Old 05-28-15, 07:14 PM
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That's why I specifically mentioned using the white and blue pair from the black cable.

You have a ton of cables I circled previously. Each one of those cables goes to a jack in the house. They WERE all connected to the white and blue from the demarc block. Now they are just waiting there to be used.

You can connect one set at a time to the DSL bridge to see if the particular jack your are plugged into starts working.

Or... connect all of them to the DSL bridge and you can plug into any jack.


Mr Awesome.... no four conductor here. The OP has data or four pair cables. I do however see one four wire cable..... maybe for alarm.

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  #22  
Old 05-28-15, 10:15 PM
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My bad, was looking at the 4 wire at the splitter and not the wad.
Yes as PJ said, use the blue pair in each cable.
Blue/white to red terminal on the jack, white/blue to green terminal.
 
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