Ice cream machine keeps tripping circuit breaker

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  #1  
Old 06-01-15, 12:03 PM
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Ice cream machine keeps tripping circuit breaker

Hi There Experts,

I hope you can give me a hand here. I recently imported an Ice Cream machine from China. Its operation is similar to a mid-size freezer and it has a compressor. Well, the machine didn't have a power plug attached to it, so rather than waiting for the supplier to send me one, I went ahead and bought a 15A, 120 volt rated plug at Lowes and attached to the device wire.

I went ahead and plugged it into an AC electric outlet in my house and immediately, I heard the noise of the compressor trying to kick in with certain struggle and a few secs after, the circuit breaker flipped.

I'm not a total expert in this subject, but I think the unit is demanding way more power than what the line is able to provide.

I contacted the supplier and requested for the electric specs of the machine and they mentioned this: 110V/60hz voltage,its power is almost over 1.2KW. and the current is 25A.

I honestly found that Amperage value really high for this type of units, but if I trust this specs, then what should I do to be able to make this machine work? Should I replace the electric plug for another that supports that amperage? Do I need to also change the CBr for that circuit?

*In case you're wondering, the AC outlet where I connected this device was completely isolated.. there were no other high electric consumption devices sharing the same circuit..


Appreciate your kind guidance!

Leo B.
 
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  #2  
Old 06-01-15, 12:10 PM
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Welcome to the forums.

Something doesn't make sense here. 1.2kw is 10 amps at 120volts.
120v at 25a is 3kw.

1200 watts sounds correct for a freezer. It should be connected to a 20A circuit breaker.
 
  #3  
Old 06-01-15, 12:54 PM
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Do you have a clamp on amp meter? If so measure the current when it trips.

If it truly does use more then 16 amps (assuming continuous load @ 80%) then the real problem isn't just the plug. It is the breaker, the size wire from the breaker, and the type of receptacle.
 
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Old 06-01-15, 01:21 PM
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I'd say it's also worth verifying that the motor is actually configured for 120V operation. You might be able to get some insight observing the motor connections directly to see if there is a nameplate or wiring diagram. Internationally-built devices often have multiple voltage capabilities that need to be field configured.
 
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Old 06-01-15, 01:28 PM
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Hello PJmax,

Thank you. I feel lucky for finding a place with very knowledgeable individuals.

I actually had the same thoughts... those specs didn't make sense to me initially..

So, in summary and if I'm understanding it correctly, I should have the current measured when the CB trips.. If that current shows a value proper for a 1.2kW device, then I have to go and take a look into the CB and make sure that it's rated for 20Amp..

worst case scenario, if the current is higher than that, then the solution is not that simple..it's require installing different wiring, in a separate CB, etc, etc.. am I correct?
 
  #6  
Old 06-01-15, 01:33 PM
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Thank you Ray2047,

I think I'll have the current measured with one of those clamp Amps. I think I sold mine some years ago, but I should be able to borrow one..

Will post back the results of my tests.

Thank you for your prompt response.
 
  #7  
Old 06-01-15, 01:35 PM
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Check the nameplate to look for data like RLA and FLA and post back.
 
  #8  
Old 06-01-15, 01:37 PM
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Hello ibpooks,

Yes i did that indeed. I opened up the case and took a peek into the compressor and I was able to see that the entire unit is a Toshiba Model. It took me a while to find its specs online, because it seems to be a non very common model in the US, but I was able to verify that it's actually designed for 110v/60Hz charge..

Thank you.
 
  #9  
Old 06-01-15, 01:58 PM
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it's actually designed for 110v/60Hz charge..
Was there any other specs like amperage or LRA listed ?
 
  #10  
Old 06-02-15, 02:32 PM
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All right... I opened up the case of the machine and exposed the compressor.. Unfortunately there is not information related to the LRA.. Please see attached a snapshot of what I see on it..

Name:  compressor.jpg
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So, this is a 110V, 60Hrz Toshiba unit. There is not information whatsoever about the min/max current drawn up, though.

I've spent a couple of hrs trying to Google the more detailed specs about this compressor and for an unknown reason, I don't find any information for this particular model.!

Then, I contacted the vendor in CHina through the night and they confirmed that the max current drawn up is 25Amp and the power is 1.2KW.. still don't make sense to me.. Next, they recommended me to connect the machine directly in the terminals of the breaker just to bypass any issues with wiring and plug not being totally capable of handling the power demanded by the machine!.. and I stopped hearing them...what kind of recommendation is that!

So, I guess.. should I just determine the current demanded by the machine and based determine if I need to make changes to the electric infrastructure?? Any thoughts?
 

Last edited by ray2047; 06-02-15 at 03:22 PM. Reason: Improve image.
  #11  
Old 06-02-15, 03:11 PM
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We are back to measuring actual amperage but you knew that. I can think of a jerry-rigged way of for testing only purposes with an electric dryer circuit (no, not plugging it in) but not something I'd recommend. You really need that amp reading. Or try finding a phone number for Toshiba.
 
  #12  
Old 06-02-15, 03:18 PM
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Have you removed all the covers to see if there is a name plate anywhere?
Geo
 
  #13  
Old 06-03-15, 06:42 AM
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Something else worth checking -- is this a reasonably modern breaker? Does it say "HACR" anywhere on it? All motors use a brief spike of current when they first start up then settle down to a lower running amperage, which may be where the 25A number is coming from. Modern breakers are designed to handle these brief jumps, but an old, weak or failing breaker might falsely trip.
 
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