Oven wiring question

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  #1  
Old 06-11-15, 06:12 AM
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Oven wiring question

Hello all. Have seen a few similar posts but need this to be right.

1982 build. I am installing a new stove that requires #8 wire. The manual has diagrams for 3 and 4 wire. I have a 2 wire #6 cable I need to add about 6 feet to. I would rather splice the wire in a box instead of replacing the entire run, which would be problematic. The panel has a 50 amp breaker right now.

So can I add the splice in a box and extend to where I need to hook up the stove?

The stove has 3 wires and ground. If I can splice should I splice and extend with the #8 3 wire or #6 2 wire like original?

And finally- The diagrams show the wire from the circuit as black/white/ground. My wire is black/black/ground. Do I treat 1 of the black as common? Have done 110 before, just not 220.

So-

1. Can I splice?
2. If yes- do I extend with the #8 3 wire or #6 2 wire?
3. What is the coreect connectio for the stove's 3 wire?
 
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  #2  
Old 06-11-15, 06:39 AM
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Hi, is that feed a cable? If so the 2 blacks are the feed and the bare braided conductor will be your neutral/ground.
If spliced,not recommended conductors must be the same size.
One other thought ,can you use a longer range cord to get to the range receptacle.
The range cord will have 3 conductors that will line up with the terminals 2 outside hot, middle ground/neutral.
Geo
 
  #3  
Old 06-11-15, 06:52 AM
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Have done 110 before, just not 220.
Just for the record nominal voltages are 120 and 240 but for your stove it is 120/240 not 240. The 6-2 SE cord is grandfathered but would not be code compliant today. Many inspectors would not let you extend the cable because the extension would have to meet current code and that isn't possible with what you have. As Geo pointed our a longer cord on the stove is one possibility but better would be to run a new 3-conductor (+ ground) cable from the breaker box and use a 4-wire cord set on the stove.

Note: title says oven but post said stove. Most stoves are 120/240. If this however is an oven then it may be 240. If it is 240 then the existing cable can be extended.
 
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Old 06-11-15, 08:04 AM
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Thanks for the fast replies guys- I should have been more specific.

It is indeed an oven and 120/240 since it has no other wiring. The cable is a feed since it has 2 black and a bare wire.

There also is no plug on the new unit, just red/black/white/ground.

So to be more specific i wanted to place a box at the oven as recommended by the manufacturor and have another wire to the old feed and another box. I understand that it not ideal, but if I cannot get the entire new #8 cable from the panel to the oven would it work? And how would I connect the new 4 wire to the older feed (black/black/bare)?
 
  #5  
Old 06-11-15, 08:47 AM
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What type of cable feeds them oven?
 
  #6  
Old 06-11-15, 04:36 PM
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Thanks guys- I thought this was straightforward- appears not. I have someone coming by to look at it.
 
  #7  
Old 06-11-15, 04:42 PM
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Yeah,
Unfortunately it not so straightforward. The problem is the bare ground in your existing cable. The new oven requires a neutral (white insulated).
 
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Old 06-11-15, 04:52 PM
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The real solution is to run a code compliant 4-wire circuit. I doubt what you have can be extended. If you look at the bare wire as a neutral a bare neutral is no longer allowed. If you look as the bare wire as a ground, which would be code compliant, then you have no neutral and you need a neutral. Is that someone a licensed electrician? Honestly If he is an electrician I would be suprised if he recommended anything but a new cable.
 
  #9  
Old 06-12-15, 05:35 AM
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Thanks guys. I have an electrician coming to wire the #8 black/white/red to the panel and will just do it that way. Like you all said it is not as straightforward as the other wiring.

Just to be clear for future though- The 4 wire seems the only way to go so it can be ground properly? Using the 3 wire with a ground to the white wire is never a good idea?
 
  #10  
Old 06-12-15, 10:10 AM
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The 4 wire seems the only way to go so it can be ground properly?
Yes, the old 3-wire was less safe. Follow the instructions with your oven if it needs to be changed to 4-wire.
 
  #11  
Old 06-15-15, 05:38 AM
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Okay, thanks.

The oven has diagrams for 3 and 4 wire connections and I will use the 4.

I have an electrician (friend of a neighbor) who is going to wire to the panel and I am going to pull the cable and do the rest. I agreed to get the wire and supplies to make it easier on him. I was surprised to find out, at least about here, the big box stores do not carry 8/3 with ground. At least not by the foot. So I will order online. I found 8-3 W/G NM-B Wire by the foot online but the description is not great. Is 8-3 W/G NM-B what I need? I just want to be sure the 8/3 with ground is 3 8 gauge wires with a #10 ground, correct? And will that fit in a regular box or do I need a thicker, say 4" box? And finally- what size wire clamps do I need for that wire? Will 3/4" do it okay?

Thanks again for all the good help.
 
  #12  
Old 06-15-15, 06:28 AM
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If you change the breaker to a 40, you can use the #8.

It seems strange that the store does not have 8-3 by the foot. The first number is the size or gauge of the conductors, the -2 or -3 indicates the number of conductors , W/G is with ground.

A deep metal 1900 box is typical for an oven connection. Metal is needed due to the metal whip out of the oven. You will also need a 1/2 or 3/4 flex connector for the whip.
 
  #13  
Old 06-15-15, 06:38 AM
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Okay, thanks. They sell it prepackaged but I do not need 25 feet and it was twice as much as what I can pay online, maybe even more. They do have 8/2 by the foot. The breaker is 50 amp right now.
 
  #14  
Old 06-15-15, 07:19 AM
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For a 50 amp breaker you need #6.

Does that price include shipping?
 
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