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Gfci breakers (single pole) in box where neutral and ground are on the samee bar

Gfci breakers (single pole) in box where neutral and ground are on the samee bar

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  #1  
Old 06-13-15, 07:54 AM
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Gfci breakers (single pole) in box where neutral and ground are on the samee bar

I am a newbie here, I have looked thru this forum and have not seen an answer to my problem. I am changing some breakers to gfci breakers to protect kitchen and
unfinished basement outlets. My service box has a bar where neutral and ground wires are both attached on each circuit. When I attach cfci wires iin this manner the breaker trips as soon as it is live. When I disconnect the ground from the bar, the breaker functions properly. Is it acceptable to leave it like this?
 
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Old 06-13-15, 08:24 AM
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Are you attaching the GFCI white wire to the neutral bar and the circuit white wire to the GFCI breaker?
 
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Old 06-13-15, 08:27 AM
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Welcome to the forums!

No, you should not leave it like this as it defeats the purpose of the GFCI device.

Look at the circuit you are trying to protect and see if it is a cable or conduit with two hot wires (anything other then white, bare, or green) along with one white wire (neutral). If there is then you have a multi-wire circuit and a single pole GFCI breaker will not work. You will need to install a two pole GFCI breaker.

If this is not the case, then you likely have something miswired. Double check your wiring and make sure you have the hot, and the neutral to the proper screws on the breaker. The neutral pigtail connects to the neutral bar of the panel, as does the ground of the branch circuit wiring.

If you do have a multi-wire circuit, or just want to save some money, use GFCI devices at the first box where the circuit goes. You can protect the entire circuit with only one device this way using the LINE and LOAD terminals and they are about 1/3 the cost of a GFCI breaker.
 
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Old 06-13-15, 08:39 AM
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I don't have a multi-wire circuit. The hot & neutral are connected to proper screws & pigtail is hooked to neutral bar. The instructions say not to hook ground & neutral together. ?? The test button works properly, it shuts down the circuit. I have read somewhere that a gfci breaker can be used on a 2 wire circuit....isn't this the same? As a note....circuit tested fine for wiring before changing breaker.
 

Last edited by vtwoodchuck; 06-13-15 at 08:47 AM. Reason: added info
  #5  
Old 06-13-15, 09:06 AM
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Ray, yes See my 2nd post.
 
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Old 06-13-15, 10:59 AM
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You might have a neutral touching a ground in a receptacle box.
 
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Old 06-13-15, 11:37 AM
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pcboss....Thanks Will chk. Am going to go with recp. per suggestion.
Thanks for the help everyone.
 
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