Go Back  DoItYourself.com Community Forums > Electrical, AC & DC. Electronic Equipment and Computers > Electrical - AC & DC
Reload this Page >

complete outdoor hot tub wiring with just flexible conduit?

complete outdoor hot tub wiring with just flexible conduit?


  #1  
Old 06-20-15, 02:44 PM
K
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jun 2015
Posts: 5
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
complete outdoor hot tub wiring with just flexible conduit?

Hello,

I'm wondering if you can do a complete outdoor hot tub wiring with metallic flexible conduit. I been looking around the internet and I haven't been able to find an exact answer if I can or not. I even have the NEC 2014 handbook, and having nearly no knowledge at all I can't really make sense of it. so I'm wondering if anybody here can help?
 
  #2  
Old 06-20-15, 03:33 PM
chandler's Avatar
Banned. Rule And/Or Policy Violation
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 36,607
Upvotes: 0
Received 9 Upvotes on 8 Posts
Welcome to the forums! First, why would you want to? It is expensive. You can do it without reservation if you want. You must have a disconnect within sight of the hot tub, and the breaker in the panel must be GFCI of sufficient amperage to handle the tub and its accessories. So any flex you run will be broken by the disconnect. What is your situation, and why is flex a good option for you?
 
  #3  
Old 06-20-15, 03:34 PM
PJmax's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Jersey
Posts: 65,121
Received 3,992 Upvotes on 3,583 Posts
I'm out on the road working so I can't check my book but i believe the code says 6' of flex max.
 
  #4  
Old 06-20-15, 03:38 PM
chandler's Avatar
Banned. Rule And/Or Policy Violation
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 36,607
Upvotes: 0
Received 9 Upvotes on 8 Posts
Pete, would that restriction apply for inside installation? I know about the disconnect-to- application is around 6', but not sure on running it inside as conduit(not that i have ever seen it done)
 
  #5  
Old 06-20-15, 06:23 PM
pcboss's Avatar
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: Maryland
Posts: 13,980
Received 196 Upvotes on 172 Posts
Pulling into flex Greenfield is a pain, especially with any bends. Also it will rust in a few years.
 
  #6  
Old 06-20-15, 07:37 PM
K
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jun 2015
Posts: 5
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
I'm kind of an impulsive buyer of stuff I don't need, so I already had a roll of this stuff on hand already.
 
  #7  
Old 06-20-15, 08:06 PM
pcboss's Avatar
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: Maryland
Posts: 13,980
Received 196 Upvotes on 172 Posts
Most hot tubs require a 40 or 50 amp circuit with 3 or 4 wires. It will not fit in 1/2" Greenfield.
 
  #8  
Old 06-20-15, 10:23 PM
K
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jun 2015
Posts: 5
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
Yeah, I thought that too, 4x 8 awg wires actually do fit in there, besides that still doesn't answer the main question.
 
  #9  
Old 06-20-15, 10:46 PM
PJmax's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Jersey
Posts: 65,121
Received 3,992 Upvotes on 3,583 Posts
Technically that isn't greenfield.... since it's watertight it's seal-tite.

By code you can only put three #8's in a 1/2" conduit. You'd need to use at least 3/4".


I located the following information....
The limitation on the length of flexible conduit was removed from the Code several revisions ago. Before that, flex could only be a maximum 6 ft in length—in all cases.

You may use flexible metal conduit in any length as long as you follow the Code rules for support (Sec. 350-18) and grounding (Sec. 250-18)

Basically over 6' and a separate ground must be used.

I think I'd check with the AHJ (inspector) before running all flex.
 
  #10  
Old 06-20-15, 11:25 PM
K
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jun 2015
Posts: 5
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
Thank you very much PJ that put me at ease, I guess since I can't use this conduit cause its too small. PVC conduit is the next good choice?
 
  #11  
Old 06-20-15, 11:27 PM
ray2047's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 29,711
Upvotes: 0
Received 15 Upvotes on 13 Posts
PVC conduit is the next good choice?
It is a good choice and certainly cheaper.
 
  #12  
Old 06-21-15, 12:31 AM
K
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jun 2015
Posts: 5
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
By chance is it possible to run the ground wire externally from the lfmc? So that the lfmc contains the 2 hots and 1 neutral and still be up to code?
 
  #13  
Old 06-21-15, 01:48 AM
pcboss's Avatar
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: Maryland
Posts: 13,980
Received 196 Upvotes on 172 Posts
All the conductors need to be in the same raceway.
 
  #14  
Old 06-21-15, 03:44 AM
chandler's Avatar
Banned. Rule And/Or Policy Violation
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 36,607
Upvotes: 0
Received 9 Upvotes on 8 Posts
Oh, gosh, I was thinking of watertite flex in the beginning, not metallic flex, and definitely not 1/2". My advice, although, workable, would be a total pita and I would never recommend it. PVC is the only way to go. Save the flex for another job.
 
  #15  
Old 06-21-15, 06:33 AM
Tolyn Ironhand's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: United States
Posts: 14,344
Received 881 Upvotes on 744 Posts
An equipment grounding conductor could be run on the outside of the conduit, however it would be required to be protected somehow by physical means, or following the building surface. This could be avoided by using #6 ground but, IMO inside the conduit would be a more professional installation.
 
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: