Service Disconnect Panel Gounding

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  #1  
Old 06-21-15, 07:48 PM
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Service Disconnect Panel Gounding

I want to run power from the service disconnect panel outside my house to my detached shed about 60 feet away. Looking at the panel though I don't see a ground. The meter above it is grounded to a rod which is not far enough in the ground. Does the panel need to be grounded itself?

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  #2  
Old 06-21-15, 08:12 PM
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Does the panel need to be grounded itself?
Some power companies require the neutral be grounded in the meter socket, when this is the case the neutral carries the ground to the panel. The neutral bus in the panel should be bonded to the panel box. You'll need a 4-wire feeder to your shed, 2 hots, 1 neutral and 1 ground. The ground and neutral both terminate on the neutral bus in the panel under the meter socket.
 
  #3  
Old 06-21-15, 08:45 PM
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I thought that might be the case just wanted to make sure before I start my project.

My plan to get power to the shed:
1" pvc conduit (size for possible upgrades)
20 amp double pole breaker in panel
4 - 12 gauge wires as you describe
heavy duty, double pole switch as disconnect for shed
20 amp GFCI for outlet run
20 amp single pole switch for lights run

At this time I only run a few power tools (miter saw, circular saw, router, etc.) and will need lights. So I thought a multi-wire branch circuit should meet my current needs.

Am I missing anything?
 
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Old 06-21-15, 09:59 PM
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4 - 12 gauge wires as you describe
heavy duty, double pole switch as disconnect for shed
20 amp GFCI for outlet run
20 amp single pole switch for lights run
Not code compliant. You can only have one feed to the shed. Instead use:
  • Four #12 (black, red, white, green) and a non GFCI 20 amp 2 pole 240 breaker (or two single pole breakers handle tied).
  • At the shed mount a 60 amp unfused A/C disconnect.
  • At the disconnect connect one 12-2 cable to the black and white from the conduit and a second 12-2 to the red and white of the conduit.
  • Use one 12-2 for receptacles with a GFCI as the first receptacle.
  • Use the second 12-2 for lights.
  • Connect grounds per code. No ground rod is needed at the shed.
This is a multiwire circuit and considered one feed so code compliant.
 
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Old 06-21-15, 10:56 PM
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Ray

Will the double pole switch not suffice for the disconnect, I've seen it recommended on here for this type of circuit?
 
  #6  
Old 06-21-15, 11:03 PM
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Will the double pole switch not suffice for the disconnect
Yes, but when you figure in the cost of the switch and a 4x4 box it will probably be more then the A/C disconsolate which needs no other box. All connections can be made inside the disconnect.

Example for price of disconnect: https://www.google.com/shopping/prod...DcnToASznqjYCA

Just a switch is $2 more than a A/C pull out disconnect. http://www.zoro.com/leviton-wall-swi...B&gclsrc=aw.ds
Then there is the cost of the box and cover plate.
 
  #7  
Old 06-22-15, 03:17 AM
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The rod needs to be 8' in contact with the earth. The conductor to the first rod needs to be unbroken. A jumper can be used between the two rods. The rods need to be at least 6' apart.
 
  #8  
Old 06-23-15, 04:03 PM
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I pigtail the neutral starting with the GFCI and every receptacle on that run?
Does the neutral on the lights run need to be pigtailed?
 
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Old 06-23-15, 05:21 PM
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Does the neutral on the lights run need to be pigtailed?
Most lights have wires not screws so you are in effect pigtailing them when you connect them.
 
  #10  
Old 06-23-15, 09:53 PM
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Sorry guys...more questions.

So the load terminals on the GFCI are not used in this MWBC? The 12-2 cable is just pigtailed to the next receptacle?

I want to use a combo switch/receptacle for the end of this run to control my mitre saw, is this the correct wiring diagram for that?

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  #11  
Old 06-23-15, 10:59 PM
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All receptacles are non GFCI except for the first one. The first receptacle is a GFCI. The next receptacle is a non GFCI fed by the load side of the GFCI receptacle.
I want to use a combo switch/receptacle for the end of this run to control my mitre saw, is this the correct wiring diagram for that?
Yes, but it can be done in a simpler way.

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  #12  
Old 06-30-15, 01:29 PM
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Finished this project today and everything is working great! Just wanna say thanks to everyone for the help!
 
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