Excess wiring in housing?

Reply

  #1  
Old 07-08-15, 09:40 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jul 2015
Posts: 11
Excess wiring in housing?

This is another "is this safe" type of questions from me...

We purchased a pendant light. The manufacturer provides waaaaay too much excess cord, and has gone out of their way to not print the polarities on the sheathing of the individual wires, beyond some little sticky labels on the very end of them. I could cut the wires but it's going to be a bit difficult for me to figure out which wire is which once I cut them. Judging by the instructions, they don't really intend for you to trim the wires.

My question is...would it be bad for me to put the excess wiring up in the box, as shown in the picture? Seems like it's a deep enough box, and it doesn't feel "stuffed" in there. Plenty of wiggle room....I'm just not sure if this is a safety hazard or anything?

Name:  IMG_1906.jpg
Views: 272
Size:  33.0 KB
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 07-08-15, 10:03 AM
ray2047's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 32,669
Cut the wire. One of the two wires should have a ridge paralleling it or writing of some kind on it. That is the neutral. All else fails use a multimeter set to ohms to determine which wire goes to the threaded shell. The shell is neutral and tab at the bottom hot.
 
  #3  
Old 07-08-15, 10:07 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jul 2015
Posts: 11
No ridge on any of the wires...they're all clear, and smooth. And, there's a ground wire, so there's three identical wires I'd need to differentiate between.
 
  #4  
Old 07-08-15, 10:35 AM
ray2047's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 32,669
Then ohm it out with a meter after cutting it.
 
  #5  
Old 07-08-15, 10:40 AM
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 4,059
I'm not a fan of coiling the wire up like that. Coiled up wires tend to create extra heat due to induction, basically you're building yourself an electromagnet. Granted, it would be very unlikely to cause any issues... but I like Ray's idea to cut the wires even if it takes a bit more work to figure out which wire is which.
 
  #6  
Old 07-08-15, 10:41 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jul 2015
Posts: 11
I really have no idea how to do any of that.
 
  #7  
Old 07-08-15, 11:13 AM
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Near Lansing, Michigan
Posts: 10,296
It's not an inductive heating problem because the hot and neutral are both running parallel in the coil which "cancels out" the magnetic field. It could be a regular heating problem just due to too much wire balled up in a closed space, but probably not given the wattage is maybe 50W at the end of that cord.

If you do want to cut it, leave 6" at the end to make the connections. Just look carefully at the cord before you cut it and trace back which one is which using your finger to keep track. You could probably just yank the three conductors apart too. That type of cord usually separates pretty easily by hand once you get it started. Mark the neutral with white tape and the ground with green tape.
 
  #8  
Old 07-08-15, 11:24 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jul 2015
Posts: 11
Yeah, might do something like that. Unfortunately the three wires aren't the "peel apart" kind, kind of like speaker wires or one of those cheap extension cords would be... The three individual wires are coated, and then there's an outer coating covering those. Not trying to make excuses but it's going to be a ***** to pull it off.

It's one LED light at the end of this thing, pulling 5W. It's one really small pendant.
 
  #9  
Old 07-08-15, 11:37 AM
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Near Lansing, Michigan
Posts: 10,296
In that case don't worry about it.
 
  #10  
Old 07-08-15, 11:53 AM
pcboss's Avatar
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: Maryland
Posts: 14,361
More of the sheath of the NM cable should be removed .

The cord from the fixture can be cut. The wires are identified by a raised rib on the white conductor. You can see that one of the conductor is silver and one is copper.
 
  #11  
Old 07-08-15, 12:03 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jul 2015
Posts: 11
I assure you, there is no raised rib, and there are no colors. It's three sets of silver colored wire, each covered by identical transparent sheathing.
 
  #12  
Old 07-08-15, 12:27 PM
ray2047's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 32,669
I really have no idea how to do any of that
Set your multimeter to ohms. Touch one probe of the multimeter (either one) to the shell of the light and the other to one of the wires. The wire that shows continuity to the shell is the neutral.

Name:  Untitled.jpg
Views: 201
Size:  22.5 KB

The image shows an analog multimeter. The needle will move to the right when you have continuity. A digital meter will show ~0.

Many here recommend a cheap ($8-$15) analog multimeter, not digital, if you need to buy one,
 
  #13  
Old 07-08-15, 12:35 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jul 2015
Posts: 11
Great, thanks -- so once I tell which is the neutral, how do I tell the difference between the other two? The hot, neutral and ground are all identical.
 
  #14  
Old 07-08-15, 02:27 PM
Member
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 6,280
Hot Wire

The tab in the center of the socket is the hot.
 
  #15  
Old 07-08-15, 03:19 PM
CasualJoe's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: USA
Posts: 9,221
We purchased a pendant light. The manufacturer provides waaaaay too much excess cord
What country are you in? Is the fixture U.L. Listed? What country did you purchase the fixture in?
 
  #16  
Old 07-08-15, 06:05 PM
PJmax's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: NJ - USA
Posts: 43,494
A 5 watt load ? Leave the extra in the box.
 
Reply

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Display Modes
'