Outdoor kitchen subpanel

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  #1  
Old 07-09-15, 05:18 AM
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Outdoor kitchen subpanel

I want to add an outdoor subpanel. How do I know if adding the panel will overload my indoor panel.I have currently my indoor panel it is a Seimans G3040 MB 1200 Series E type 200a.
load is as follows.
ac 40a
hot tub 50a
pool 40a
dryer 30
stove 50a
22 20a circuits.
I want to add a total of 40 a to each leg. Please let me know if you need more info.
thanks!
 
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  #2  
Old 07-09-15, 07:18 AM
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You need to do a "demand load calculation" to determine if your existing service is adequate to support the new kitchen loads. You figure in the actual loads in the calculation, not the breaker sizes. There are a number of online calculators and spreadsheets to help with the figuring.
 
  #3  
Old 07-09-15, 05:02 PM
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Thanks , I worked through the load calculation and the alternate calculation. The standard calculation came out to 224a and the alternate worked ot to be 155a. So I can go with the alternate is this correct?
 
  #4  
Old 07-10-15, 06:40 AM
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What is your 40 amp load, or are you just adding a 40 amp circuit?

Shooting from the hip, I highly doubt you will overload a 200 amp service.
 
  #5  
Old 07-10-15, 07:06 AM
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As long as the city inspector allows the alternate, but in general yes you can.
 
  #6  
Old 08-16-15, 02:05 PM
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What type and size cable or single conductor can I use considering the main panel is inside the home and the sub panel will be outside and will be run threw a concrete slab in conduit? I would prefer using some kind of cable to do the complete run.
 
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Old 08-16-15, 02:15 PM
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The only "common" cable you can use outside is UF. You will need 8/3 UF for 40 amps. I would not go smaller then 1 1/4" PVC as pulling cable through conduit can be quite a task. Bigger is almost always better.
 
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Old 08-17-15, 12:51 PM
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Thanks for the advise! I will post more when I get this job completed.
 
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Old 08-17-15, 02:05 PM
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I have a load center that is set between studs that is flush mounted with the drywall.I want to exit the load center on the bottom with the conductors. The other circuits are exiting the load center from the bottom behind the drywall. Do you have any suggestions on how I run a new circuit without disturbing the drywall? I want to run the new circuit down and on the floor joists on an unfinished basement.
 
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Old 08-17-15, 02:37 PM
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Do you have any suggestions on how I run a new circuit without disturbing the drywall?
Not easily. I would suggest installing a permanent plumbing access panel below the Breaker panel. If you want something smaller use a hole sized for a two gang low voltage ring then install the ring and a blank cover plate when done fishing.

You could drill from below and use a fiberglass fish rod to try to hit the right knockout in the panel by blind luck but it would probably be a lot more frustrating IMHO.
 
  #11  
Old 08-17-15, 04:49 PM
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Drive a self tapping screw into the knockout and twist it back and forth.
 
  #12  
Old 08-28-15, 08:36 PM
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I have been reading about sub panels. I have read that the neutral is not bonded to ground in the sub panel. But I have seen some where there are ground rods connected to the sub panel ground bar and others are not? Why? Which is correct?
 
  #13  
Old 08-28-15, 08:56 PM
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Current code requires an isolated neutral bar and a separate bonded ground bar. Older codes allowed a combined bonded neutral and ground if there was no other metallic pathways. Those older systems are grandfathered till enough remodeling is done to require all electrical involved in the remodel to be brought up to current code. Amount of remodeling that triggers a change is determined by the local AHJ.
 
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Old 08-28-15, 09:14 PM
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Since you are installing a new sub panel..... run the four wires.

Usually a ground rod is only used for a sub panel in a detached building like a barn.

Usually there is enough room under a panel so that you can send up a pushrod from the basement and guide it into a knockout working under the panel. You're using large cable which will require a 3/4" connector.
 
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Old 09-08-15, 12:08 PM
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Thanks for all the advice. I have run into a problem with a short run of romex. It is testing shorted. It is the last outlet in a string of outlets. It is a Gfci.The wire runs inside an outside wall with brick on the outside and drywall on the inside and terminates about 7 ft away outside on a Gfci in a screened porch. Suggestions on how to replace the wire with as little damage as possible?
 
  #16  
Old 09-08-15, 12:43 PM
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Good example of why code no longer allows naked romex to run through penetrations in brick walls. Best suggestion would be to not think about replacing it as-is, but to find a different path that is more accessible without disturbing the building finish. Attic? Basement? Run along the outside all in conduit? Outside and underground? Maybe feed it from a different or new circuit?
 
  #17  
Old 11-04-15, 04:49 PM
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I want to run a conduit thru a poured basement wall. How do I seal out water?
 
  #18  
Old 11-04-15, 05:34 PM
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Silicone around the conduit.
 
  #19  
Old 11-04-15, 09:56 PM
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Remember that you have 200 A on each hot leg of the 240 V 200 A service. Each 120 V circuit uses power from only one hot leg.
 
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