Powering EarthWise 24V Cordless mower


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Old 07-12-15, 12:41 PM
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Powering EarthWise 24V Cordless mower

Hello all,

I had this mower for 5 years and it served me well. Currently, it takes me two charges to mow my entire lawn, front and back. That is not a huge problem, as I'm somewhat lazy .

I was wondering if I could power the mower directly from the outlet, using the plug pictured. The plug you see is hooked up to the battery and is identical to a PC cord. It does say 10A 250V, however, I'm not sure it applied to the motor itself, but rather to the cord. Any thoughts?

 
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Old 07-12-15, 01:50 PM
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You say this is the charging cord for the battery? Is there a transformer involved in any way? You can't, of course, connect house current to the mower. Connecting the transformer and cord to the mower will cause the transformer to burn out prematurely due to the excessive load placed on it by the motor. As you know it was made to operate -- charge battery -- battery to mower-- mow. Does the manufacturer still make batteries for it. Yours are obviously losing their capacity for holding a long enough charge.

Edit: Yeah, I see where Amazon has the battery for about $100, so it isn't a total loss.
 
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Old 07-12-15, 02:03 PM
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There is a separate charging port on the mower and it won't even spin the motor when charger is connected. Like I said before, this particular PC plug is connected to the battery only, so is it possible that the motor could run on 20A 24V or 10A 120V?
 
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Old 07-12-15, 02:30 PM
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It will depend on the rating shown on the plate. It will need to be DC current, not AC, so you can forget the 120 volt application. And I am afraid any transformer will burn up with the load.
 
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Old 07-12-15, 02:40 PM
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A transformer will only get you half way there. The mower uses DC and the house power is AC. You would need a converter that changes the AC to DC in order to power the mower. You could likely buy about 10 batteries for the equipment to do this. You would be better off just buying a plug in electric mower that is set up to run off of 120 volt AC power.

The cord is rated 250 volts max. That is just so the manufacture can use one cord for many country's.
 
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Old 07-12-15, 03:33 PM
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I figured it's the rating for the cord. I guess I'll get a new battery next year, or when the old lasts 15 minutes or less.
 
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Old 07-12-15, 04:02 PM
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I bought one of these mowers, but with only the DC input jack, last week for $25. The woman didn't want to attempt changing the battery herself and the dealer was 50+ miles away. I just took it out of the trunk of my car and tried to start it and amazingly it did start but the red light (battery very low) also came on. I plugged in the charger and I'll see if it takes a charge or not.

One thing to remember, it is best to NOT run it until the red light comes on but to stop and recharge as soon as the yellow light comes on. Lead-acid batteries do NOT like to be discharged much below 50% and doing so will reduce the number of times it can be charged back to full capacity. Something else that might work is a battery desulphator (look on Ebay). I recently bought one for my riding mower but I don't have enough experience to know it it really will help. I think I will remove the battery from the Earthwise and connect the desulphator and a charger to see if I can resurrect the battery.

Otherwise, I would say that a new battery would be the best as it appears to be a very nice machine. With the one-touch height adjustment, the steel deck and folding handles I might keep this one myself rather than cannibalizing it for the motor which is the reason why I bought it.
 
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Old 07-12-15, 04:47 PM
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Ryan, One minor change. Could you please change my tee shirt size to adult XL rather then Large.
What about deep cycle batteries, and is the battery in the mower a deep cycle?
 
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Old 07-12-15, 04:56 PM
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You can buy an exact replacement battery for $110-120 or as I am planning to buy this set and assemble it myself using the original housing. http://www.amazon.com/ML18-12-Earthw...+mower+battery

I have my battery on a timer, so it shuts off after 18 hours or so. Also I had it charged once a month during off season, as recommended in the manual. I think it help to last this long.
 
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Old 07-12-15, 07:23 PM
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Tolyn asks:
What about deep cycle batteries, and is the battery in the mower a deep cycle?
The battery is a pair of 12 volt gel cells wired in series. By their very nature gel cells are deep cycle.


I am going to have to revise my opinion of this mower. I just spent the last couple of hours destroying the one I bought, which is okay since all I wanted was the motor. The plastic shroud is held on by six screws, two sheet-metal screws and four fine thread machine screws. All the screws have Phillips heads and at least one is so far recessed that it takes a VERY long screwdriver to remove it...IF you can remove them at all.

The mower I bought seemed to have been well taken care of other than scraping the packed clippings from inside the deck BUT the screws were rusted solid. I was able to remove only one of the sheet-metal screws and none of the machine screws. Maybe if I had used a good hacksaw blade in my pneumatic saw I could have cut them off underneath the shroud but all I had were Harbor Freight blades. After getting the shroud cut into several pieces I removed the battery hold-down straps and attempted to remove the batteries, they were NOT coming out and I broke the handles in the attempt. Finally, by prying with a big screwdriver I got them out, it appears that the rubber shims used were just tight enough that they would not allow the batteries to be removed.

Now as I understand SOME of the Earthwise mowers have a door on the shroud that allows easy battery removal for external charging and swapping in a fully-charged battery to continue mowing. That would be an excellent idea in my mind.

I'll probably get about $4-6 at the recycler for the battery and all the steel which will make the price of the motor about $20. Not too bad for a motor that has a replacement price in excess of $100.
 
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Old 07-13-15, 01:55 PM
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It's time to look at lithium ion cordless mowers. I had a Black and Decker 24v lead acid, then a Sears 48v lead acid. The batteries wear out and don't have the power through the whole cycle and are expensive to replace. I now have a Greenworks GMax 40v (came with an extra Lithium ion battery). It lasts for more than 30 minutes on each battery and has an auto powerboost for heavy grass. There are many other brands, now, with the new batteries, some even more powerful.

Cordless has finally come of age.
 
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Old 07-14-15, 07:09 AM
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Either buy the proper replacement batteries or by a corded mower. Cordless are neat and convenient but they batteries need replacing. It's a fact of life and there is no way around it. Corded saves the hassle of a gas engine and it can run all day if needed and they tend to be less expensive to by up front. I have a 20 year old corded at a vacation home and have a 5 year old corded at home and they both run as well as they did when new.
 
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Old 07-14-15, 01:21 PM
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My Black & Decker CM1000 mower is about 16-17 years old and still going strong with the original Gel Cell sealed lead-acid batteries. I attribute the long life to never running the batteries down to a very low level but charging them as soon as the power meter started to dip into the yellow range. The bottom of the (plastic) deck is broken but it still cuts just fine.

The B&D CM1200 I bought ($25 off of Craig's List) a few weeks ago had a bad battery pack but otherwise is in better shape than the older model. I will be swapping the battery and maybe a few other parts from the older mower, maybe even this week.
 
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Old 07-15-15, 08:58 AM
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Cords are convenient? Lithium ion batteries have changed the game for cordless mowers, especially with regard to power, battery life and convenient swapping. If you have budget restraints, fine, but my 40v machine is awesome, and this years models with 54v and 80v options are even better.
 
 

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