Double switch wiring

Reply

  #1  
Old 07-21-15, 11:58 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: Goodwood, Ontario
Posts: 140
Double switch wiring

I hope you guys can solve a mystery I've encountered in renovating my kitchen. There is a double switch with 2 incoming circuits (21A and 23B). Circuit 21A controlled a light over the stove that I no longer need. Circuit 23B controls a ceiling light which I'm keeping. I want to replace the double switch with a single one that controls the ceiling light on circuit 23B and use 21A to power a new range hood that does not need a wall switch because it has its own.

When I opened the box I expected to find 4 cables, 2 incoming and 2 outgoing. But there are only three:
1. Incoming cable 23B
2. Incoming cable 21A
3. Unidentified cable which I assume is outgoing
I don't understand how there can be 2 incoming cables and only 1 outgoing.

Attached to the double switch are:
-- The black wires from all 3 cables
-- The white from 23B
The whites from 21A and the third cable are attached separately.

My questions:
1. I now need only one switch on circuit 23B. What kind of switch should I get -- single pole?
2. How would I wire the new 23B switch?
3. I need 21A to power the new range hood that has its own switches. I've already run new cable from the box to the location of the new hood. I assume I'd simply connect the 21A cable to the new one, black to black and white to white. Right?

Thanks
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 07-21-15, 01:22 PM
ray2047's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 33,050
Attached to the double switch are: The black wires from all 3 cables
Do you mean a duplex switch? If so is the tab on one side intact or removed? If the tab is there is one black wire connected to it?
The white from 23B The whites from 21A and the third cable are attached separately
Do you mean they are connected to each other?

Name:  BG.jpg
Views: 71
Size:  23.6 KB
 
  #3  
Old 07-21-15, 05:33 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: Goodwood, Ontario
Posts: 140
Ray2047, thanks for your help. Yes it is a duplex switch. The tab was removed.

The white from 23B is connected to the switch as are the blacks from all three cables. The white from 21A is connected to the unidentified white with a wire nut -- they are not connected to the switch.

23B's white and black are connected to the terminals of the top switch. This switch controls a ceiling light.

The blacks from 21A and the unidentified cable are connected to the terminals of the bottom switch. This switch controlled a light that I have removed. The light was mounted inside a big restaurant-style range hood that I've also removed. The cable came through the ceiling, entered the top of the steel hood and went into a surface-mount junction box to which the light was attached. The old hood and light are now gone, leaving only a cable hanging down from the ceiling.

Next to the box with the duplex switch is another box which holds a rheostat switch that controls a rooftop exhaust fan that was ducted from the old big range hood. This is also on circuit 21A and still runs. The rooftop fan will be removed just before I put in a new conventional range hood.

So, if all goes well, two boxes, side by side, that now contain a duplex switch and a rheostat will be replaced by one box. This box will have one switch controlling the ceiling light on 23B and a set of cables connected on their own that will carry 21A power to my new conventional range hood which has it own switches for fan and light.
 
  #4  
Old 07-21-15, 07:20 PM
ray2047's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 33,050
If this is correct:

Name:  BG.jpg
Views: 80
Size:  9.3 KB

The top switch is a switch loop for what ever 23B feeds.

The bottom is power in power out to whatever unknown is.
 
  #5  
Old 07-22-15, 07:05 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: Goodwood, Ontario
Posts: 140
OK. So it looks like I simply get a single pole switch and attach 23B white and 23B black. Should I mark the white with a black marker to indicate that it's hot? Then, using wire nuts, I connect black 21A to black unknown and white 21A to white unknown. Right?

Thanks
 
  #6  
Old 07-22-15, 10:11 AM
ray2047's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 33,050
Should I mark the white with a black marker to indicate that it's hot?
Yes.
Then, using wire nuts, I connect black 21A to black unknown and white 21A to white unknown. Right?
Yes. .
 
  #7  
Old 07-22-15, 12:12 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: Goodwood, Ontario
Posts: 140
Thank you very much for your help Ray!
 
Reply

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Display Modes