14-guage Wire for 220 Volt?

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  #1  
Old 07-24-15, 02:58 AM
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14-guage Wire for 220 Volt?

Does anyone know if I can use 14-gauge wire for 220 volt? Is the insulation standard or maybe variable?

There are 2 14-gauge wires inside a plastic sheath on a product designed to be used in America (110V) but it's double insulated because of the extra sheath, which leads me to believe this should be fine. Of course, I'd rather not be electrocuted.

Please note that the power usage will be the same, therefore the current half. These are just lamp holders to be used with local bulbs rated at the same power rating at our voltage.

Therefore I am only asking about the insulation and voltage.

Edit to add: It also now occurs to me that the insulation of the individual 14-guage wires inside is also important to ensure that there is no transfer of voltage between wires, which would be rather bad.
 
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Old 07-24-15, 04:03 AM
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Not sure about South African electrical set up, but the gauge of wire is determined by amperage, not voltage. An item designed for North American usage on 120 volts may not be compatible with your 220 volts.
 
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Old 07-24-15, 04:33 AM
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An item designed for North American usage on 120 volts may not be compatible with your 220 volts.
Yes, this is why I am asking this.

I gather that, yes, the gauge and current are related but is there no standard for insulation? Just because it is sold in America for use with 110V does not mean it's rating is limited to 110V. In fact that would be downright irresponsible as there should always be some headroom.
 
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Old 07-24-15, 06:37 AM
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Ok, don't worry. I figured out that the thing is made in China and only purchased by American companies. But it is actually rated at 300V so can be used here.

For future reference, a piece of electrical wiring like this one is not nearly the same as an electronic device. The fact that I am also using resistors rated for this voltage makes this perfectly ok as no other resistors, motors, boards or anything that may not be compatible are present.
 
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Old 07-24-15, 11:44 AM
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Just because it is sold in America for use with 110V does not mean it's rating is limited to 110V
That would likely be NM-B cable here in the U.S. and it is rated at 600 volts.
 
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