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OK to run mast through exterior wall instead of outside the wall?

OK to run mast through exterior wall instead of outside the wall?

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  #1  
Old 07-24-15, 06:15 AM
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OK to run mast through exterior wall instead of outside the wall?

My current 200 AMP electrical service attaches to the rear of my single-family house's second-story roofline, and passes over a single story addition.

During an electrical inspection, the city inspector recommended that the service be raised up since anyone walking on the addition roof (or future teenager sneaking out from the second floor bedroom window above the addition roof) could grab hold of the service line. The electrical wire passes about 4 feet above the first floor addition.

My thought is to have a 2" steel mast raised above the roof line of the second story roof on the main house (Rigid Metallic Conduit), pass the pipe down through the roof, down through the exterior wall, and install a combined meter and external disconnect in a semi-flush fashion (so the box is inside the stud cavity, but projects out past the exterior cladding). That is, the pipe would be inside the wall, not mounted outside the wall. The service feed would then run into the subpanel that is in the basement.

This would also solve any safety issues when I plan on tyveking/residing the exterior of the house (since the cable currently runs down the side of the house/attaches to the siding).

I believe the mast must be within 4' of the edge of the roof, and the conductors must be a minimum of 18" above the roof (http://ecmweb.com/site-files/ecmweb....N230-11web.jpg)

To be clear, I will have my electrician do this work.

It appears that running the mast inside the wall vs outside the wall is commonly done out in the west coast with stucco finishes (http://www.nachi.org/forum/attachmen...285-small-.jpg)

Anyone ever done this type of work before?
 
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  #2  
Old 07-24-15, 07:21 AM
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Pictures of the house are definitely needed. http://www.doityourself.com/forum/el...rt-images.html

You are talking about in the area of +15' of pipe in order to pass thru the second floor wall and the first floor.

That would require a pipe coupler due to the length. You'd need to very carefully check for anything in the wall that would be in the way. You'd also need to drill thru the second floor plate.

This would appear to be an ambitious/involved project unless I'm not understanding you correctly.
 
  #3  
Old 07-24-15, 10:56 AM
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During an electrical inspection, the city inspector recommended that the service be raised up since anyone walking on the addition roof (or future teenager sneaking out from the second floor bedroom window above the addition roof) could grab hold of the service line. The electrical wire passes about 4 feet above the first floor addition.
Unless the inspector can cite some obscure city code requiring this, I'd leave it just like it is. If you are worried about teenagers coming in contact with it, how are you also going to keep them from climbing the utility poles?
 
  #4  
Old 07-24-15, 11:43 AM
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The unufused conductors must remain outside the building or remain as short as practical inside. Your plan does not meet that requirement .
 
  #5  
Old 07-25-15, 05:08 AM
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Right , NEC art. 230.6 pretty well covers that.
Geo
 
  #6  
Old 07-25-15, 06:15 AM
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I'm sure insurance companies and firefighters hate fire sources that are hidden. Burndown of the service entrance conductors do happen, as the result of a lightning strike to name one cause. Thus, the 2" concrete encasement rule.
What's interesting around me is the proliferation of clamped PVC insulated service conductors on the exterior of homes, sometimes over 20' in length. These houses are all stick houses that would burn down quickly if that conductor lit up. At least the initial fire would be visible to cars passing.
 
  #7  
Old 07-25-15, 03:11 PM
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Those conductors are considered outside the building. I know the point that you are trying to make, but they are code compliant.
 
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