Dryer Wire in Conduit- Outside Installation

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Old 07-27-15, 02:25 PM
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Dryer Wire in Conduit- Outside Installation

I have to provide a 240V supply line to a stackable washer dryer in an interior second floor location. [large closet with H/C water, drain, 120v, and venting]
The service panel is in the basement on an exterior wall with a mast type service entry. I can access the area where the panel is above grade through the exterior wall.
There is no way to get the wire through the interior of the house as it is completely drywalled.

I want to run a 10/3 wire from the closet where the stackable is installed up into the attic, out through the gable end of the house and into rigid PVC conduit. The conduit will run down the wall and with 90 fittings turn and enter the house beside the existing service panel. I have space in the existing panel for a 30 amp double pole breaker to serve the washer/dryer combination unit.

I understand that the 10/3 wire must be UF and installed in conduit that is 3/4" minimum. I believe that the conduit should be rigid PVC. I am aware that I cannot completely enclose the conduit where it passes through the insulated exterior wall.

Note- the stackable used to be a 120 volt unit, but they are no longer available in Canada. we had previously supplied a 15amp duplex receptacle, however when it came time to replace the stackable washer dryer, we were unable to locate any that operate on 120 volts in Canada. We have an existing dryer vent running through the attic and exiting in a termination at the soffit.

My question is- Does the described work meet the Electrical code in Canada. I cant find anything in my code book describing the application that I am trying to do.
 
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Old 07-27-15, 04:15 PM
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I understand that the 10/3 wire must be UF and installed in conduit that is 3/4" minimum.
Best practice would be to use individual conductors such as THWN in conduit not cable. Cable would be hard to pull. You can mount a PVC box on the outside wall and run NM-b (Romex) inside the house into the back of it. You can then run your conduit from the outside box.

Wire designations may be slightly different in Canada.
 
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Old 07-28-15, 09:11 AM
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The plan is essentially solid. In Canada you could use NMWU (called UF in the USA) or THHN/THWN individual conductors as Ray suggested. Standard indoor NMD (NM-B) cable cannot be used in this case. You could use either PVC or EMT (thinwall galv. metal) conduit on the exterior of the house and paint to match the house.

The conduit must be sealed well with duct seal putty where it enters and exists the building and ideally at each junction box too. Conduits that go back and forth through heated spaces can build up a lot of condensation if not sealed properly.
 
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Old 07-28-15, 10:16 AM
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Thanks very much for the information.
I will be installing a locking waterproof enclosure on the outside wall to transition to conduit and THHN/THWN connectors. The conduit will run vertically up the wall, through the soffit and re-enter the attic space to terminate at the interior junction box.
When I use THHN/THWN individual connectors in the exterior conduit run, please confirm that I should be installing a junction box in the attic, where the conduit terminates and switching back to NM-b Romex 10/3 to continue the run to the dryer receptacle location.
 
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Old 07-28-15, 11:41 AM
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The THHN can run the entire length if you use conduit. If you want to use a cable like Romex without conduit indoors, then you will need a junction box to make the transition. I would consider using ENT (flexible PVC conduit, "smurf tube") on the inside portion of the run just to avoid the double junction box. The ENT can glue into the rigid PVC fittings also. If you did that, you would only need LB fittings at the transition to/from outside and could use continuous lengths of THHN. Alternatively, use a little bit larger conduit like 1" with LBs in and out and stick with the UF/NMWU for the entire run. I prefer options that reduce or eliminate junctions, which add expense and are potential failure points.
 
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