Lighting and outlets on the same circuit?

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  #1  
Old 07-31-15, 12:16 AM
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Lighting and outlets on the same circuit?

I've been googeling for an hour and have found conflicting information so I thought I'd post...

1. Can a single bathroom be supplied with only one 20 Amp circuit to power lights (overhead, and vanity), a single GFCI outlet, and an exhaust fan? Provided all wiring is 12 guage, and the lighting is upstream of the GFCI?

2. Can a garage have lighting and outlets on the same 20 Amp circuit? Provided all wiring is 12 guage, and on a gfci breaker?

I understand it is not ideal to have lighting and outlets on the same circuit, but is it acceptable? I'd run more circuits but my panel is getting pretty full.
 
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Old 07-31-15, 04:44 AM
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1) Yes

2) Yes. However GDO circuit must be separate and GFCI, depending on code version.

It is an inconvenience for sure. Go to your garage and want to change out a light fixture, you'll do it in the dark, because you can't even plug in a lamp to help out.
 
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Old 07-31-15, 08:19 AM
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2. Can a garage have lighting and outlets on the same 20 Amp circuit? Provided all wiring is 12 guage, and on a gfci breaker?
Yes, but you could also use a GFCI receptacle rather than the breaker. The lights don't need GFCI protection, but all receptacles do.
 
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Old 07-31-15, 12:39 PM
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Thanks for the reply. To clarify, does the GDO need a dedicated circuit? And it should or shouldn't be GFCI protected?
 
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Old 07-31-15, 12:55 PM
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The GDO doesn't need a dedicated circuit. All receptacles in the garage must be GFCI protected.
 
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Old 07-31-15, 03:23 PM
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Thanks for that Ray 2047, I could not find that rule, if in fact the mfg. Requires a separate circuit then that would be a different story.
Geo
 
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Old 07-31-15, 03:27 PM
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if in fact the mfg. Requires a separate circuit then that would be a different story
Thanks. I forgot to mention that part. Note if the receptacle is in the ceiling it should not be a GFCI receptacle but instead protected by an easily accessed GFCI device.
 
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Old 08-04-15, 01:37 AM
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Just to follow up, I ended up installing a single 20 Amp circuit in the garage to control the lights, outlets, and garage door opener outlet.

I spoke with a local electrician (Oregon USA) and he said that while all outlets must be GFCI protected (including ceiling outlets), if the GDO outlet is a single outlet (not a duplex), it is doesn't have to be GFCI protected.

I also checked the manual of the Chamberlain 1hp GDO I just bought, and there is no mention of it needing to have it's own circuit.
 
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Old 08-04-15, 03:47 AM
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I spoke with a local electrician (Oregon USA) and he said that while all outlets must be GFCI protected (including ceiling outlets), if the GDO outlet is a single outlet (not a duplex), it is doesn't have to be GFCI protected.
That would be a LOCAL code revision as the NEC makes no distinction and requires that ALL receptacles in garages, regardless of their position, configuration or usage to have GFCI protection. Remember that the NEC by itself is only advisory and has no provisions for enforcement. It is only when enacted into law by a legislative body on the state, county or municipal level that the code becomes law and the enabling legislation has the authority to add to or delete from the model code as it sees fit.
 
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Old 08-04-15, 11:57 AM
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That would be a LOCAL code revision as the NEC makes no distinction and requires that ALL receptacles in garages, regardless of their position, configuration or usage to have GFCI protection
I know of a few municipalities that wll also still allow a single receptacle without GFCI protection in a garage to power a refrigerator or freezer. Interestingly, none of these municipaliies, as far as I know, wrote an amendment to the adopted code to allow for this. It seems that in many areas the inspectors either take it upon themselves to rewrite the codes they inspect to or they just haven't kept up with the newer code changes.
 
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Old 08-06-15, 07:55 AM
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It seems that electrical inspectors (probably other disciplines as well) either have a great deal of leeway in how they interpret and/or enforce their local codes or else they simply take that position without any specific authority to do so. I have known inspectors that allow re-identifying conductors of less than #4 size when the work is done by a homeowner or non-profit organization with limited funding. I have seen installations of EMT coming from underground PVC conduit through concrete be approved and I have known at least one inspector that absolutely would not pass ANYTHING that wasn't to the absolute strictest letter of the code.

Now I have no problem in allowing the re-identification of any size conductor as long as the identification is reasonably permanent (multiple overlapping wraps of colored plastic tape) but I would never accept EMT underground or as a stub up through concrete. The distinction between a single and duplex receptacle for things such as garage door openers, refrigerators, freezers or sump pumps would be a very minor thing in my book provided the receptacle was situated as to preclude the easy usage of the "open" receptacle for general usage.

On the other hand, when I took the Civil Service examination for electrical inspector (in Seattle) although I scored very high I was never offered the position.
 
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Old 08-06-15, 10:07 AM
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On the other hand, when I took the Civil Service examination for electrical inspector (in Seattle) although I scored very high I was never offered the position.
My best guess, Furd, is that you weren't well enough poltically connected.
 
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Old 08-06-15, 01:05 PM
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Could be. When I took the exam for Boiler Inspector I was number two on the list, a man that already had a National Board (ASME) certification was first and my buddy who was a personal friend of the chief boiler inspector was at the bottom of the list. My buddy was given the job and then several chances to pass the National Board exam, all of which he failed. The man with the NB certification threatened to sue the city for discrimination (he was a minority) and after something like 18 months my buddy was let go and the man was offered the job.

 
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