Moving an outlet and converting it into a gfi

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  #1  
Old 07-31-15, 08:02 PM
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Moving an outlet and converting it into a gfi

I have a working receptacle that gas 3 romex wires connecting to it. Set 1 is a 14/2 and set 2 is 14/3 and set 3 is 14/2. The only hot wires are the red and black from set 2. Here is how the outlet is wired. Set 1 white is connected to bottom left of receptacle and black is connected to red of set 2. Set 2 white is connected to top left rear of the receptacle and black is connected to the top right of the receptacle. Set 3 white is connected to the top left and black is connected to the bottom right. My goal is tone remove this outlet and install a gfi about 3 feet higher.
 
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Old 07-31-15, 09:21 PM
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3 romex wires
Cabels not wires. Wires are individual conductors.
The only hot wires are the red and black from set 2.
That sounds like you used a non contact tester. A non contact tester can't be used to determine if a wire is hot only that it might be. Often it is a false positive. You need to use a multimeter, preferably analog. Note: Receptacles have no top or bottom or left or right. They have brass screws and silver screws.
My goal is tone remove this outlet and install a gfi about 3 feet higher.
Is half the receptacle controlled by a switch? If so do you want to continue using that switch? Would you be okay with leaving the receptacle where it is and just adding a receptacle above it? Why do you need the higher receptacle?
 
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Old 07-31-15, 09:22 PM
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Is the tab on the hot side of receptacle removed? I think half of the outlet is always hot and the other half switched. Can you confirm this?


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  #4  
Old 08-01-15, 06:03 AM
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The tabs are still whole. Half the receptacle is controled by a switch. The reason I was going to move the outlet is I am remodeling my kitchen and I will be placing a run of cabinets there. The reason I was using a gfi is because I thought that was code for the kitchen.
 
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Old 08-01-15, 06:07 AM
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Also I did use a multimeter to test the red and black wires. I tested them in parallel and it was 240v
 
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Old 08-01-15, 08:02 AM
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If the tab is still in place the receptacle is not half switched.

The splice will need to remain accessible. The cabinet cannot cover the splice.
 
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Old 08-01-15, 08:20 AM
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Before saying how to move this we need to confirm the wiring.
I said I thought it was half switched, belay that. It looks like it's a multi-wire branch circuit.
See if you can find the 2 breakers that control the circuit.
Breakers will be tied with a handle, or separate locations in panel if older home.
 
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