Another "help me run power to my shed" thread

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Old 08-06-15, 07:43 AM
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Another "help me run power to my shed" thread

So I've built a 12x20 shed that I need to run power out to. I will be using a 15 amp table saw, a 12 amp miter saw, a 15 amp bench top planer, work lights, a window unit (very small) ac and a radiator/oil filled space heater in the winter. My power company was willing to run a new service drop out there at no charge, but that would require 17$ a month minimum/second account etc, AND all the local electricians quoted me crazy prices for a meter base/panel install (1000$+). So I'm just gonna run some under ground feeder cable and go the DIY route. So a few questions:

1) I want to run a 50-60 amp line out to the shed, so I will need to run a new line to a sub panel from the existing breaker, and that sub panel will then have the 3 different 20 amp services on it correct? I figure a 20 amp service to the power tools (I should only be running 1 at a time, I'm a hobbyist DIY/woodworker), 1 20 amp service to the lights, and the third 20 amp service to the AC/heater.

2)How much of the feeder cable can be above ground? I do not have a direct line to the existing breaker due to my septic field being in between the house and the shed, so I must go around. What I was thinking was digging a straight 18" deep line to the front of my deck, and then having the conduit come above ground and be attached to the underside of my front porch. It is a very short front porch with barely 15" of space beneath it. The idea of trying to dig a 18" trench under that sounds awful...So I was wondering if I could just run PVC conduit under the deck, and secure it to the bottom of my deck (At least 15" off the ground). I've attached a crude paint drawing to help better understand. Would this be against code? I tried to find clear descriptions of running above ground conduit, and it seems like it is allowable as long as you are above a certain height. I figured 15" plus being inside PVC conduit would be more than enough to protect the cable. Name:  Untitled.jpg
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For the actual connecting to the breaker/sub panel etc, I will be having an electrician friend come do all that part but I just wanted to be sure the way I'm gonna run my cable seems ok.
 
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Old 08-06-15, 07:47 AM
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Also, should my subpanel be right next to my main panel in the house? Or should I put the subpanel out in the shed?
 
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Old 08-06-15, 08:31 AM
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so I will need to run a new line to a sub panel from the existing breaker
What existing breaker? For the new subpanel in the shed you will need a 2-pole breaker in the main panel. For a 60 amp feed you will use a 60 amp breaker. Any existing feeds to the shed will have to be abandoned.
How much of the feeder cable can be above ground? I do not have a direct line to the existing breaker due to my septic field being in between the house and the shed, so I must go around. What I was thinking was digging a straight 18" deep line to the front of my deck, and then having the conduit come above ground and be attached to the underside of my front porch.
18 inches is only deep enough for conduit. Best practice is to use individual conductors in conduit not cable. If you used direct burial cable no conduit you need 24" minimum. Under the porch for conduit would be fine. You will need two #6 black THWN (or black and red), one #6 THWN white, and one #10 green THWN wire in your conduit.
should my subpanel be right next to my main panel in the house?
The subpanel would go in the shed. You will need to add a ground bar to it. I would suggest a 100 amp main breaker panel kit. Usually the cheapest way to go since they include a few branch circuit breakers. The 100 amp main breaker serves only as a disconnect switch so the fact it is more than 60 amps doesn't matter. In addition you will need one or two "x8' ground rods at the subpanel connected to the ground bar in the subpanel by a #6 wire. Ground bar in the subpanel is bonded and neutral bar isolated.
 
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Old 08-06-15, 08:38 AM
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I mean the existing breaker on the house. Why individual conductors and not the whole cable? I thought it was made to be ran inside conduit, but if that is a better route then sure. So I will connect the newly ran line to the existing breaker in my house using a 60 amp 2 pole breaker. Then the other end of the cables will be connected to the sub panel actually on the shed. Got it, makes sense.
 
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Old 08-06-15, 08:45 AM
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I mean the existing breaker on the house.
Do you mean breaker box? A breaker is an over current protection device found in a breaker box.
Why individual conductors
Easier to pull.
and not the whole cable? I thought it was made to be ran inside conduit
No, cable is intended for direct burial with no conduit except for short sections where it enters and leaves the ground or otherwise needs protection.
 
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Old 08-06-15, 08:47 AM
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Yes, sorry the breaker box.
 
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