Replacing standard receptacle with GFCI

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Old 08-10-15, 10:02 AM
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Replacing standard receptacle with GFCI

I have this older receptacle in the kitchen near the sink that isn't GFCI and I wanted to replace it with one, when I tried I couldn't figure out what wire to put where since there's 2 live wires (red and white marked with black electrical tape) and one neutral. The red and neutral come from the same wire (12/3) and the white marked with black electrical tape is from another wire. The black wire from the 12/3 is wire-nutted to other black wiresThat receptacle must power another one, which I swapped out for a GFCI with no problem.
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Old 08-10-15, 10:20 AM
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You will not find a gfi receptacle rated for use with aluminum wire.
 
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Old 08-10-15, 10:27 AM
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Canadian code requires split circuit receptacles in the kitchen. This basically means (at least) two circuits in the kitchen with the top of each receptacle being circuit 1 and the bottom being circuit 2. This prevents the use of standard GFI receptacles in the kitchen.

I'm not fully versed in the CEC, but I think this means you need to use a double-pole GFI breaker in the panel.

It looks like you have another issue though... that looks a lot like aluminum wiring. Aluminum wiring can only be connected to aluminum-rated devices.

Again, I can point you to some US resources regarding aluminum wiring, but I assume they would be similar in Canada:
CPSC Safety Recommendations For Aluminum Wiring In Homes | CPSC.gov

In a nutshell, you can only use Al rated devices, and can NOT splice aluminum to copper without approved connectors (and even so, the only agreed-upon quality connection is COPALUM Crimping, which is not DIY-able and isn't cheap.

Sorry to be the bearer of bad news...
 
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Old 08-10-15, 10:35 AM
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It is possible that the tape is a repair to the insulation.

I think the are using the device to splice the two whites together instead of using an approved splice on the multi wire neutrals.
 
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Old 08-11-15, 03:00 PM
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Again, I can point you to some US resources regarding aluminum wiring, but I assume they would be similar in Canada:
CPSC Safety Recommendations For Aluminum Wiring In Homes | CPSC.gov

In a nutshell, you can only use Al rated devices, and can NOT splice aluminum to copper without approved connectors (and even so, the only agreed-upon quality connection is COPALUM Crimping, which is not DIY-able and isn't cheap.
More recent CPSC publications recommend the AlumiConn connector as an alternative to the expensive Copalum system.

https://www.cpsc.gov//PageFiles/118856/516.pdf

CO/ALR devices are also recommended in Publication 516.
 
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