Converting 220 line to 110

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  #1  
Old 08-16-15, 04:49 AM
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Converting 220 line to 110

I have removed an old wall oven from my kitchen and wonder what's involved in converting the dedicated 220 line to 110.

The 220 line starts at a sub-panel in a basement kitchenette just below the main kitchen. It was on two 35-amp cartridge fuses. The cable has three wires: black, white and red. There is no bare or green ground wire.

The cable comes up through the floor. It went into the cabinet that held the wall oven. That cabinet has been removed so there is now just a capped cable coming up through the floor next to the wall. (I've also removed the two cartridge fuses to make sure the line is dead and attached a note explaining what it is and where it runs from.)

If not too complicated, this line could be useful as another 110 power point.

Thanks
 
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  #2  
Old 08-16-15, 04:57 AM
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How hard would it be to just pull the old cable and install a new 12/2 for the new device? Just refuse to 20 amp.
Geo
 
  #3  
Old 08-16-15, 06:13 AM
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Without a ground the cable should not be re-purposed.
 
  #4  
Old 08-17-15, 09:59 AM
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It turns out this is a ground. The bare wire was cut so short that I didn't notice it. So there are 3 wires -- white, black and red -- plus a bare ground wire. At the sub-panel cable connects to a cartridge fuse holder that had 2 35-amp fuses.
 
  #5  
Old 08-17-15, 11:01 AM
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If you can replace the fuses with 20A, these can be used as a 120V receptacle circuit. You will need to pigtail on short lengths of #12 wire so that it will fit on the screw terminals of a receptacle.
 
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Old 08-17-15, 11:09 AM
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I'd suggest gutting the subpanel and using it as a junction box. Run 12-2 NM-b from the subpanel to a 20 amp single pole breaker in the main panel. Splice the black, white, and ground of the new cable to the black, white, ground of the old cable. Cap the red of the old cable. At the receptacle box cap the red and pigtail* the black, white, ground to the new 120 v receptacle with #12 wire..

*Pigtail because the old wire is probably too large for the new receptacle.

Tech note: Nominal voltages are 120 and 240 not 110 and 220.
 
  #7  
Old 08-17-15, 05:21 PM
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I'll discuss this with my handyman. Thank you!
 
  #8  
Old 08-17-15, 05:32 PM
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I'll discuss this with my handyman
Better to discuss it with your electrician.
 
  #9  
Old 08-18-15, 07:43 AM
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Ray, I would love to turn over all of this stuff to an electrician. But there are only a few in the two small towns that service my rural area and with a building boom underway none of them are interested in small jobs, especially if it means driving any distance. So this chat group is a Godsend for me. Thanks to you and the others for your help.
 
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