Shed wiring

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  #1  
Old 08-26-15, 10:02 AM
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Shed wiring

Good morning from Michigan,

I'm wiring a detached 10x12 metal shed. I have 2 30amp breakers tied together with a bar available in my homes main panel.
I've wired #10 4-wire underground rated romex to the shed. Romex runs through rated pvc conduit from home, under deck, underground, through wood floor of shed. Romex runs up inside shed wall to 60 amp box with two 20 amp breakers inside. Box is mounted to 3/4" plywood plate screwed to wall of shed. I'll mount 1 gfi plug in 1st position from each breaker. I have not yet connected any wiring, main or shed.

I wish to run a 4 bulb florescent overhead lamp (or 2 2-bulb lamps) with wall switch and one or two 15 amp wall plugs to one side. And run 4 15 amp wall plugs to the other. I have a Craftsman 10" table saw, 30gal Craftsman air compressor, 15" drill press, and combo belt/disc sander to run and various recharges for hand/garden tools. The saw, compressor, drill press, and sander are used only occasionally.

After reading forums I'll be putting in 2 ground rods just outside the shed (or through the floor??)

At suggestion from a friend I've wired such that I can reconfigure to 220v in future if I think I need it. Currently everything in shed is 110v.

Have I set up the proper circuitry for load needed?
 
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Old 08-26-15, 10:05 AM
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Note, this 60amp box doesn't contain a main disconnect, just the two breakers.
 
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Old 08-26-15, 10:17 AM
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The 4 wire feeder will already provide the 240 capabilities.
 
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Old 08-26-15, 10:25 AM
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Great, does everything else sound right. I wasn't sure about stepping down in amperage from house to shed to plugs made sense.
 
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Old 08-26-15, 10:25 AM
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Note, this 60amp box doesn't contain a main disconnect, just the two breakers.
How many circuits will the panel accept? If over 6, you need a disconnect or main breaker for a disconnect.

I've wired #10 4-wire underground rated romex to the shed
Could it be 10-3 W/G UF cable? UF cable doesn't need to be in conduit, but the NEC doesn't prohibit it from being installed in conduit.

one or two 15 amp wall plugs to one side. And run 4 15 amp wall plugs to the other
You probably mean receptacles. Plugs are a type of male cord cap and are plugged into receptacles.

At suggestion from a friend I've wired such that I can reconfigure to 220v in future if I think I need it. Currently everything in shed is 110v.
Your voltage is 120/240 and not 110/220.
 
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Old 08-26-15, 10:25 AM
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How many breakers can you install in the 60 amp sub panel? If it is not more than 6 then it is fine. If it is not more then the two you have already installed you might want to consider installing a 4-6 circuit panel for your future 240 volt circuit.
 
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Old 08-26-15, 10:32 AM
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Thanks

- 2 circuits in 60amp box, so no main required

- this romex contains 4 wires, red, black, white, and bare.

- yes, recepticles

- ok 120/240
 
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Old 08-26-15, 10:36 AM
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thanks,
not really likely to use 240 for myself. someone else can wire it if/when I sell property. for my purposes I've probably over-killed it already.

Can anyone comment on the amperage step down?
 
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Old 08-26-15, 11:23 AM
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General purpose circuits for list and receptacles are limited to 20 amps maximum. The larger feeder gives you room to run additional items at the same time.
 
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Old 08-26-15, 11:34 AM
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The 30 amp circuit sounds good to me.
 
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Old 08-26-15, 07:02 PM
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Psst! In the U.K. and some other countries, "wall plug" refers to a wall mounted receptacle.

Since (in the U.S.) "male receptacle" is used from time to time, I supposed that "male wall plug" would be used in the U.K. to refer to the same thing also referred to as an "inlet."

"Amperes step down"

Lights, appliances, etc. will attempt to draw however many amps they normally run with regardless of the wiring.

The only way and required way to prevent too many amperes from being drawn and prevent the resultant overheating of the wires is to use circuit breakers or fuses or comparable devices. The 10 gauge wiring running to your shed will support at most 30 amps so you must have a breaker set of no more than 30 amps in your house panel to protect that shed feeder circuit.

It is okay and in fact customary for the sum of the breaker ratings in the panel to exceed the master breaker rating since it is unlikely that all of the branch circuits will be drawing their maximum currents at the same time. Example: two 20 amp breakers (serving their respective branch circuits) in a subpanel fed by a 30 amp 120 volt circuit.
 

Last edited by AllanJ; 08-26-15 at 07:29 PM.
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