New bathroom wiring validation?

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  #1  
Old 08-28-15, 04:04 PM
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New bathroom wiring validation?

Hello,

I'm putting in a new bathroom. The new bathroom is going to have an outlet on the wall outside of the bathroom, two recessed can lights in the shower as well as an exhaust fan. The shower lights are switched as one as is the exhaust fan. Both will tie back to a single box with a dual switch. Is how I've diagrammed this correct? You'll see power comes into every box and switched power is indicated with a red dashed line. I'm a little confused as to returning the neutrals back to the switch box as it has the chance to end up their twice. The diagram is kinda hectic, if it helps for me to flatten it out a little let me know.

Note: if it is not required to bring power-in to every box let me know and I think I understand how this could be simplified.

full image: http://i.imgur.com/IRUdlui.jpg

 
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Old 08-28-15, 04:11 PM
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You only need 12-2 from the switch to the fixtures. You don't need a constant and a switched hot in the boxes.
 
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Old 08-28-15, 04:35 PM
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You don't need a constant and a switched hot in the boxes.
Understood, I'll redraw and post back in a bit.

Thanks!
 
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Old 08-28-15, 05:43 PM
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Yes.... that is a confusing drawing. When we draw circuits here we omit showing the ground wire as that is understood.

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  #5  
Old 08-28-15, 06:10 PM
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@PJmax, got it. For some reason I forgot those dual switches come default with that little bridge between switches in there. So if I read your drawing correctly I'd be using 12/3 with ground and the fan switch leg simply passes through (nut) each light?
 
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Old 08-28-15, 06:13 PM
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You have drawn the circuit effectively but you have not shown what wiring your are using.

Look at my drawing..... two wire in to receptacle...... two wire to switch...... three wire to first
light, etc.

You could use two wire in to receptacle..... two wire to switch.... two wire to lights... and a second two wire cable to the fan.

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Old 08-28-15, 06:29 PM
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@PJmax,

Yikes, I think we're submitting our posts too fast and the other is not reading it. Sorry ...

I see your most recent drawing from 07:13. This makes sense. We're good.
 
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Old 08-28-15, 07:37 PM
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No problem..... I type fast and am on a fast connection. As long as you understand the diagrams you're good. Don't hesitate to stop back if you have further questions.
 
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Old 08-28-15, 07:46 PM
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In that case... just to clarify on your bottom drawing, I'd be taking a 12/3 with ground out from the switch and carrying the fan switch leg through the lights (e.g. simply wire nut in the first light and then wire nut to a 12/2 on the second light to continue on to the fan)? Thanks again! I promise I'll never make another electrical drawing like I did before, hahah.
 
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Old 08-28-15, 07:53 PM
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No problem....

The top diagram utilizes a three wire cable from the switch to light one. Then to the second light with a three wire cable and a two wire cable from the second light to the fan. This type of wiring gets difficult since you end up with 2) three wire cables in the first light.

The second diagram uses a two wire cable from the switch to the lights and a second two wire cable from the switch to the fan. This is the preferred method as it reduces clutter in the light junction boxes.
 
  #11  
Old 08-29-15, 03:19 PM
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So this is not so much a wiring question as it is a GFCI question... I need the sink outlet to be GFCI as well as the circuit for the exhaust fan.

1. For the sink outlet I was planning on using a regular breaker and having the outlet itself be GFCI. Is this ok?

2. For the exhaust fan's required GFCI circuit can I have the outlet that the exhaust fan and lighting feed from be a GFCI outlet? I figure so long as I leverage the "load" screws then any downstream circuits are protected. For this question really what I'm trying to avoid is buying a ~$50 Siemens 20A GFCI breaker when a 20A GFCI outlet is ~$10.

Thanks!
 
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Old 08-29-15, 03:39 PM
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The gfi protection can be from a breaker or receptacle.

As long as the circuit only serves one bathroom you can add the lighting and fan to the 20 amp circuit.
 
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Old 08-29-15, 03:42 PM
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As long as the circuit only serves one bathroom you can add the lighting and fan to the 20 amp circuit.
So the GFI outlet that I'm referring to (a different one than that is by the sink) is technically located directly outside the bathroom in a 6'x10' mudroom. Does that matter?
 
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Old 08-29-15, 03:53 PM
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So the GFI outlet that I'm referring to (a different one than that is by the sink) is technically located directly outside the bathroom in a 6'x10' mudroom. Does that matter?
If it is not in the bathroom it can't be on the bathroom circuit. There is no specific requirement for the receptacle in a mud room to be GFCI.
 
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Old 08-29-15, 04:04 PM
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If it is not in the bathroom it can't be on the bathroom circuit.
Ok, in that case I'll ditch the outlet in the mudroom and simply make a dedicated GFCI breaker based circuit for the lights and fan.

Thanks!
 
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Old 08-29-15, 04:13 PM
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I'll ditch the outlet in the mudroom
Local code probably requires at least one and you may have to meet the 12 foot rule. Read more: http://www.doityourself.com/forum/el...6-ft-rule.html
make a dedicated GFCI breaker based circuit for the lights and fan.
It is best to not have the lights on a GFCI (except for special exceptions) That way you don't loose the lights if you trip the GFCI. With one circuit only the easiest (and often cheapest way) is a GFCI receptacle after the lights.
 
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Old 08-29-15, 07:29 PM
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I have another circuit that I'm pulling out that I can re-purpose to the mudroom, no big deal. Any thoughts on my first question?

1. For the sink outlet I was planning on using a regular breaker and having the outlet itself be GFCI. Is this ok?
This is the only "thing" that will be fed off this breaker.
 
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Old 08-29-15, 07:35 PM
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The gfi receptacle is fine.
 
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