Outlet box height question...

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Old 08-28-15, 09:13 PM
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Outlet box height question...

Hi folks!
Just closed and moved into my new home. It has a 20' X 20' detached garage that I plan to use as my recording studio/mancave. I
just got my permit from the city and have everything I need to run the 100 amp subpanel in the garage. I have all of the holes for the wiring already drilled out to accept the 12/2 wiring. Beings that I'm new to the state of Oregon the NEC codes in this area might be a little different than where I'm from (Kentucky)
The garage itself has a cement floor with an 8" concrete wall all the way around it with a 2X6' bottom plate to support the 2x4 walls on top of that bolted into the concrete.
My question is this: Do I measure from the cement floor up to code for my outlet boxes,or do I measure from where the 2x6 plate is up to code for the boxes? Any help from any fellow Oregonians out there (or anyone else of course ) would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks in advance, Danguitarman
 
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Old 08-28-15, 09:45 PM
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There really is no code for receptacle height.

When we wire a house or commercial...... the height is specified AFF..... above finished floor.
Receptacles are normally installed at least 15" to the bottom of the box.
 
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Old 08-28-15, 10:21 PM
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For my garage, I placed receptacles at switch height, about 48" from floor.

The important thing here is not to purchase a 100 watt Marshall Tube amp, it may disturb all connections.
 
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Old 08-29-15, 01:02 AM
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The National Electrical Code is the same all across the United States. Further, the NEC has NO enforcement provisions, it is ONLY a "model" code of suggestions. It is ONLY when a legislative body (state legislature, county council or municipality) enacts legislation to adopt the NEC as the local or regional code that it gains any power of enforcement. The enabling legislation may add to or delete from the NEC as the lawmakers see fit. The ONLY code that matters is the code enforced in your LOCAL jurisdiction. You need to check the LOCAL code to see what is, and is not, allowable.

That stated, I personally have never known of a code that specifies a particular height that receptacles need to be mounted. In some "occupancies" (buildings or areas within a building) codes MAY specify a minimum height due to the possibility of flammable, heavier than air vapors or other hazards. In these areas it is usually required that receptacles be no less than eighteen inches above the finished floor level. There is also a general (NEC) requirement that all receptacles in "unfinished areas) generally interpreted to mean basements and garages that have a concrete floor with no finished flooring must have all receptacles protected with GFCI devices.
 
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Old 08-29-15, 05:42 AM
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I think the "height" thing has been addressed well. One thing further, install a bunch of them at the onset. You can never have too many in a garage/shop set up. Cheaper to install them now, than to do it later, especially if you finish the wall above the concrete. I have gone into many garages/shops which were built with minimal standards and probably had 2 or 3 receptacles, just to satisfy the inspector. Put in a work bench and you need receptacles over it. Plan ahead.
 
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Old 08-29-15, 07:50 PM
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Hi, Thanks for your response. I just had 40 Sq. Ft. of carpet and 7/16 pad delivered. So I suppose that means that since my concrete floor is essentially 'covered' that I'm not required to have GFCI outlets? I'm not going to be running anything in my man-cave but audio gear and a HD Home theatre preojector. No power saws or anything along those lines.

Thanks again, Danguitarman
 
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Old 08-29-15, 08:02 PM
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It wouldn't hurt to use GFI receptacles.... especially with tubed amps.



As an aside.... I supply sound to bands and stages. I have quad boxes that I use to power the band's amps and back line equipment. Those boxes are GFI protected. I've seen guitar players touch a grounded microphone while holding and playing their guitar.
 
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Old 08-30-15, 07:33 AM
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Finished rooms do not require GFI. Unfinished areas require GFI. It sounds like this will be a finished room, so unless you're concerned about grounding and such, they aren't required.

Most residential outlets are installed at a standard height... usually something like the height of the hammer that the electrician used.
 
 

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