Outside Ground Rod

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  #1  
Old 09-02-15, 02:45 PM
kennyv519's Avatar
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Outside Ground Rod

Just bought a home and was told by the inspector that it needs a few electrical issues resolved. First, the home has a brand new 100amp service with breakers. Inspector stated that whoever did the work did a great job so I'm glad to hear that anyway.

But...

1) It needs a new service cable installed from the incoming lines to the box. The current wire is the old style line with the wire over the insulation. The box and line is right behind the wall where the line comes to the house from the pole so there won't be a need to run a long length of wire.

2) No ground rod found. I know these are 8 foot lines that need driven into the ground. I am hearing that I should have two of these installed about six feet from one another and driven in at a 45 degree angle away from one another. Does this make sense?


Questions are as follows:

I'm going to obviously have a pro do the service cable. I'm guessing I'm responsible for buying the new cable as well as the meter? What items will be needed for this as far as wire size and the type of meter needed? I was going to maybe buy a meter to handle 200amp service in case I upgrade the electric down the line.

Besides the ground rods above, what else would I need to purchase to complete this install? I'm talking about clamp types for the wires as well as the wire gauge sizes needed?

Any tips, advice, constructive criticism is welcomed!

Thanks guys and gals!
 
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  #2  
Old 09-02-15, 03:12 PM
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The power company supplies the meter. That is 100% their property.

Your home has a brand new 100A panel.... not new service. That's what you need to change.
Since you have a brand new 100A panel..... you'll be replacing the service cable with 100A.
You will probably be replacing the meter pan too.
If you upgrade/upsize the service outside you would need to upsize the panel inside.

If you've hired an electrican...... either check with him what to buy or let him supply it. My customers DO NOT supply service products to me when I work on services.

A picture or two of your outside service would be helpful. http://www.doityourself.com/forum/el...-pictures.html

Ground rods can be 6' apart and can be driven straight into the ground.
 
  #3  
Old 09-02-15, 03:31 PM
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In MN we never have to install two grounds unless there is not a main grounding electrode such as a water service to bond to. I suggest checking with your AHJ to see what is required in your area.
 
  #4  
Old 09-02-15, 04:53 PM
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It is easier to drive two rods than to take the time to test and prove that the one rod has a resistance lower than 25 ohms or less.
 
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Old 09-02-15, 04:57 PM
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take the time to test and prove that the one rod has a resistance lower than 25 ohms or less
Never had to do that either.
 
  #6  
Old 09-03-15, 01:47 PM
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The electrical engineer I work with is the one who stated that two rods are needed as well as the grounding of the panel box to the water meter! He's saying its a code thing here in Pennsylvania!

I would like to know if I can setup now for a possible 200amp conversion down the line. In other words, is there special service wiring needed for this? A larger meter perhaps? I just want to do now what is needed for the local occupancy permit and then down the line maybe have the higher amp service installed.
 
  #7  
Old 09-04-15, 06:54 AM
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For a 200A service, you would need bigger service cable and a new meter pan. If you have conduits, those would probably need to be increased also. The power company would have the option of increasing their drop size, but probably would not. Two rods plus the water service ground is the common way to meet national code, but as Tolyn pointed out, some places have local codes that vary. There are also other possibilities, such as if your house has an Ufer ground in the footings, which would make other methods unnecessary.

What is the goal of upgrading to 200A? Do you plan to do major additions or electrical load increases? A service should be sized by a "demand load calculation" in which you plug in all the electrical parameters of the house and get out the appropriate service size.
 
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