110 or 220?

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  #1  
Old 09-10-15, 10:09 AM
mik
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110 or 220?

I am going to install a new hot tub outside under a covered deck. I live in a village, where we have municipal service (commonly referred to as, "village electric") The village electric service is slightly less expensive than the major national service providers. But someone told me that if I hook up the hot tub using a 220 line, then the monthly bill will be less than if I used a standard 110 outlet connection. I have the capacity in my panel box to accommodate the 220 line, or I can use a 110 connecting cord and plug the tub into an outlet on the deck. Any thoughts on whether the 220 hookup would result in a lower monthly bill?
 
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Old 09-10-15, 10:13 AM
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There's basically no difference between running it 120v or 240v. A 240v motor may run a little more efficiently but the difference is very minor and the largest amount of power used by a hot tub and for the heaters to keep the water warm and they consume the same number of watts of power no matter what voltage they run on. In your case I would certainly run it on 120v if the available outlet will provide sufficient current to run the tub.
 
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Old 09-10-15, 10:44 AM
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The operating cost should not be much different one way or the other. On 120V the tub will run longer heating cycles, but use less power during that longer time. On 240V, the tub will run shorter heating cycles but use more power. Mathematically it should be exactly equal amount of energy consumed. In practice there would be some slight efficiency improvement in favor of the 240V connection, but it would not be more than a few percent.

The installation cost will be higher for 240V. On some tubs, when you use the 120V cord, it can only run the heater or the blower at the same time (meaning the water will get cooler as you sit in it with the lid open). It will also take roughly 4 times longer to get back up to operating temperature versus 240V connection. For those tubs you need 240V hookup to run both the heater and pump at the same time. Check with the manufacturer of your tub to see what implications along those lines you get from connecting 120V instead of 240V.
 
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Old 09-10-15, 11:08 AM
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Confirm that your spa will operate the same on 120 and 240. Some Hot Springs spas that run on 120 run either the heater or main jets but not both at the same time while 240 volt models can run the heater at the same time as the main jets pump.
 
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Old 09-10-15, 07:16 PM
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110 or 220?
You have neither, you have 120/240 volts to your home.

But someone told me that if I hook up the hot tub using a 220 line, then the monthly bill will be less than if I used a standard 110 outlet connection
That is the wrong person to be getting electrical advice from.
 
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Old 09-10-15, 07:44 PM
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I'm intrigued. Are you saying that there are two electrical companies (or one electric company and the town electric) and you can choose which service you can connect to or buy from ?

That would be the first I've ever heard of two providers in the same area.
 
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Old 09-10-15, 08:08 PM
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PJ there are six or seven here but they all provide it through the same service provider and then to make it even more confusing that provider owns one of the retail electric companies and the service provider is owned by the gas company. Now hows that for confusion. Rates are all over the place.

Historical note: There is now only one gas company but when I moved here there were two providing gas to different parts of the city. Then one gas company bought the other gas company and then bought the electric company and then the state changed the law to allow competing electric companies in the same area.
 
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Old 09-11-15, 06:47 AM
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MIK; we are in the same county. AFAIK, RG&E and Fairport El are the two distribution (delivery) providers. RG&E customers may elect to choose a different energy provider, and they will have a different rate. Nowhere do I see an option for any choice for voltage discounts.
 
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Old 09-11-15, 07:57 AM
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Pete, there were two power companies in my area when i moved in.
Since then power has been deregulated and I can buy power from anywhere. The local company sends the bill and is still responsible for transmission and repairs.

To OP, something to remember is your meter is a watt/hour meter. You pay for the watts consumed, regardless of voltage. The difference is amapacity. Higher voltage allows for smaller conductors to be run to carry the load. A 20 amp load at 120V will be 10 amps at 240V. It would be 200 amps at 12V.
 

Last edited by pcboss; 09-11-15 at 10:15 AM.
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Old 09-11-15, 09:03 AM
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The local company sends the bill and is still responsible for transmission and repairs.
That is the norm. That's pretty much the same everywhere. I have the option of purchasing raw power from several different companies or my primary poco.

I was under the impression the OP had the choice of two actual wire line providers.
 
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