Transforming a cordless drill into a corded one

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  #1  
Old 09-11-15, 05:00 PM
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Transforming a cordless drill into a corded one

Hello,

Iv'e seen a lot of tutorials and even tried to do it myself, but no one never mentioned how to tackle the momentry peaks issue and lack of torque.

So i wired my 9.6v cordless drill to a 12v 3A laptop charger, and it works fine until som3 torque is needed.
Momentry amperage can hit 12 amps, which a common power supply can't really provide.

Is there a way to properly wire a cordless drill and overcoming thw momentry peak\torque issue without buying an expensive power supply? Maybe some additinal circuitry (eg. a large capacitor) can solve this issue?

Thanks
 
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  #2  
Old 09-11-15, 05:35 PM
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There is no easy way to do what you're looking to do. Capacitors and things like that like you mentioned if wired correctly may be able to handle an instantaneous peak but it won't be long enough to do any significant work like you were trying to do. You need to either use it as a cordless drill like it was designed for or go out and buy a corded drill.
 
  #3  
Old 09-12-15, 12:57 PM
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But corded drills usually have lower torque and way more RPM, arent they?
you usually wont use a corded drill to screw screws for that reason.
 
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Old 09-12-15, 01:27 PM
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It depends on the drill. Most drywall screw guns are corded ..... or least ways they used to be.
 
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Old 09-12-15, 01:32 PM
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so, do you know a trick making a corded drill suitable for screwing?
 
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Old 09-12-15, 04:13 PM
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A drywall screw gun is best suited for it but I've used variable speed drills to do the same thing many times before cordless come around.
 
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Old 09-12-15, 04:20 PM
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FYI;
I have a corded Milwaukee screw gun and a corded1/2" HF variable speed/reversing drill. Use both of them for driving screws. Also have several battery drills that see occasional use. They are limited as the battery runs down on big jobs.

RR
 
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Old 09-12-15, 04:20 PM
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But corded drills usually have lower torque and way more RPM, arent they?
you usually wont use a corded drill to screw screws for that reason.
That's not necessarily true, it depends on the drill you buy. Many corded drills, especially the larger ones have lower rpm's. The reason that cordless drills have lower rpm's is because they use the speed reduction to increase torque. If they ran at the high rpm's like corded drills are capable of running they would have hardly any torque!
 
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Old 09-14-15, 12:07 PM
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I would buy a cheap, corded, variable speed drill instead of screwing around with this.

It has also been my observation that corded drills have more torque, not less.
 
  #10  
Old 09-25-15, 03:25 AM
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afrom what i understand
Cordless drills use gears to lower rpm and increase torque, while corded drills use voltage reduction to lower rpm, and by this theyre lowering the torque too thatls why the generalization is that corded drills have less torque, at least on slow speeds.
 
  #11  
Old 09-25-15, 06:51 AM
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Drill

If you are interested in controlling the depth of drive of the screw gun, use a drywall screw gun.
 
  #12  
Old 09-25-15, 07:40 AM
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Corded and cordless drills all use gear reduction to slow rotation and increase torque. The ratio depends on the drill type & design. DC motors deliver full torque at low RPM but the brushed "universal" motors that power corded hand drills are not much lower. Universal motors can spin much faster than permanent magnet DC motors so this allows higher gear ratios.

A good heavy duty variable speed corded drill has plenty of torque to twist your wrist and snap screws.
 
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