GFCI Trips When Plugging Something into Other Outlet

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  #1  
Old 09-19-15, 11:06 AM
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GFCI Trips When Plugging Something into Other Outlet

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Size:  43.6 KBSo, whenever something is plugged into the outlet on the left, it trips the GFCI on the right. I've replaced both outlets and I'm still having the same issue. The GFCI works on it's own, but whenever anything is plugged into the standard outlet, the GFCI trips. Any suggestions???? Thank you.Attachment 56313
 
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  #2  
Old 09-19-15, 11:33 AM
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Turn off breaker, unscrew the non GFCI receptacle and pull it out. so it hangs by its wires and you are sure the wires aren't touching. Plug something into the non GFCI receptacle. Turn the breaker on. Does the GFCI receptacle trip?
 
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Old 09-19-15, 11:47 AM
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Just to add what Ray posted. Are there four wires on the GFI receptacle ?
 
  #4  
Old 09-19-15, 11:47 AM
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Try the same appliance in another gfi. If it also trips the problem is the appliance.
 
  #5  
Old 09-19-15, 01:42 PM
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4 wires, plus the ground. Not the appliance....i've tried many different appliances...same result
 
  #6  
Old 09-19-15, 05:54 PM
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Did you install this ground fault circuit interrupter or did someone else do it?

Open up the GFCI box. Are any of the wires inside red?

Multiwire branch circuits (usually identified by having a red wire) together with GFCIs need special wiring techniques.

Do the two wires attached to the "line" terminals of the GFCI unit disappear into the same cable sheath at the back of the box?

Do the two wires attached to the "load" terminals of the GFCI disappear into the same cable at the back of the box?
 
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Old 09-19-15, 07:53 PM
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It was installed by a previous owner. I pulled out the GFCI and took some pics. Doesn't look like wires are touching. Name:  IMG_4536.jpg
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Old 09-19-15, 07:59 PM
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Did you run the suggested test with it pulled out?
 
  #9  
Old 09-19-15, 08:08 PM
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Yes. I ran the test. Only the very ends are bare, so they're definitely not touching each other.
 
  #10  
Old 09-19-15, 08:18 PM
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Let me add that my range is also on the same circuit as it turns off when the GFCI is tripped. I looked at the range manual and it requires a 15 amp circuit. The GFCI is on a 20 amp circuit. Don't know if that means anything, though!
 
  #11  
Old 09-20-15, 06:48 PM
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You have a GFCI outlet. A second outlet is connected to the GFCI outlet. When anything is plugged into the second outlet, the GFCI trips. You have replaced both outlets, but nothing changes.

Questions:
1) Does what you plug in have to be turned on, or does simply plugging it in do it?
2) Where does the range enter into this? Is it after the second outlet, or where exactly?
 
  #12  
Old 09-21-15, 08:25 AM
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the applicance needs to be turned on for the GFCI to trip. Even an iphone trips it. The range is to the right of the GFCI. It's a gas range. There are a couple of other outlets on the circut as well. They all work fine. It's just the 1 outlet that causes the GFCI to trip. Thank you.
 
  #13  
Old 09-21-15, 11:46 AM
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Disconnect the cables from the receptacle. Using a multimeter determine which cable to the problem receptacle is hot. Reconnect the receptacle to the hot cable only. Plug in a lamp and see if the circuit trips.
 
  #14  
Old 09-21-15, 06:59 PM
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The only thing I can come up with is that the second outlet is attached to the ground instead of to the neutral. If not that, then I am stumped.
 
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Old 09-21-15, 07:17 PM
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The only thing I can come up with is that the second outlet is attached to the ground instead of to the neutral.
But it doesn't trip till the load is turned on.
 
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Old 09-21-15, 07:19 PM
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The only thing I can come up with is that the second outlet is attached to the ground instead of to the neutral.
What the heck does that mean? Please show a picture of this receptacle and its connections.
 
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Old 09-21-15, 07:33 PM
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Furd, he is not the O/P. I am skeptical of his idea too.
 
  #18  
Old 09-22-15, 12:05 PM
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If the silver terminal of the 2nd outlet is connected to the ground wire instead of to the neutral wire then it will trip the GFCI when anything is plugged in.

Nothing else (that I can think of) will trip the GFCI when something is plugged in, but not when nothing is plugged in. Well obviously a defective device will trip it, but the OP says anything will do, and they don't trip the actual GFCI. There has to be a fault on the neutral side, but it is hard to say how it requires something to be plugged in.
 
  #19  
Old 09-22-15, 01:16 PM
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It very well could be a skinned cable which is a causing a ground fault to a metal box, clamp or staple. Pulling everything off the load side of the GFCI and incrementally adding them back on or ringing them out with an ohmmeter until you find the fault.
 
  #20  
Old 09-22-15, 01:22 PM
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But the O/P says it doesn't happen till a load is turned on. Wouldn't that happen even with out a load?
 
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Old 09-22-15, 01:27 PM
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The trip couldn't happen until at least >6mA of current flows on the load side of the device.
 
  #22  
Old 09-22-15, 01:36 PM
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Thanks for the clarification. Now it makes sense to me.
 
  #23  
Old 09-22-15, 01:54 PM
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I would disconnect the Load side white wire only, right at the GFCI. Leave it hanging. Does the downstream recept still have 120v?
 
  #24  
Old 10-17-15, 01:32 PM
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Hi. I'm the OP. Finally getting back to this. So I disconnected the White Line wire only on the GFCI. When I do this, the outlet that was tripping the GFCI works, but the GFCI does not. All of the other outlets on the circuit work when I do this. I tried disconnection the other White wire. When I did this, the outlet still tripped the GFCI. Thank you!!!!!!!
 
  #25  
Old 10-17-15, 02:47 PM
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So I disconnected the White Line wire only on the GFCI. When I do this, the outlet that was tripping the GFCI works,
The receptacle fed by the GFCI should be dead. There should not be any power to it. Disconnect the cables to the GFCI. Open the receptacle that is tripping the GFCI and disconnect the two cables. Using a multimeter measure between the black and white of each cables (breaker on). They should show ~0 volts.
 
  #26  
Old 10-17-15, 03:13 PM
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What's the expression about the simplest solution is usually the correct one?

On the non-GFCI outlet, the ground and neutral wires were reversed. The ground has white paint on it so it wasn't obvious. I switched the wires and all is well.

Thank you for all your help.
 
  #27  
Old 10-17-15, 04:31 PM
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Glad you got it but I'm puzzled. A bare copper wire with paint should look nothing like a wire with white insulation. Guess we should have listened to Toller in post #18.
 
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