Ensonq ASR 10 keyboard: 60h > 50hz ?

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Old 10-16-15, 12:49 AM
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Ensonq ASR 10 keyboard: 60h > 50hz ?

Hey Guys,

Thanks in advance on any info or advice you can give me. I know there are a lot of similar posts asking this type of question but I am really hoping for specific advice to a Ensoniq ASR 10 keyboard. so i will try and be as detailed as possible.

I bought a ensoniq ASR 10R (this is an old keyboard/sampler from the 90s) from the US to use in Sweden. thinking it would not be an issue to use a voltage converter to fix the voltage difference but have since realised the difference in Hz frequencies. I cant find any info on whether the ASR 10 can run on both 50-60hz. on the back of it the rating only says 60Hz (photo attached)

this is an old keyboard made in 1995 that is no longer in production. i found a service manual that has a little bit of info on the power supply board and how it works (photos attached)

so my questions are:

do you think it will run fine using this in Europe with a voltage converter?

if yes, what sort would you recommend?
if no, would it be possible to replace the power supply board with one that from a European model?

Thanks again for any insight, my electronic knowledge if fairly limited but can happily try to provide more info you need.

Cheers,
Ben
 
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  #2  
Old 10-16-15, 12:53 AM
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Just realised the photo of the back of the asr is really hard to read but the rating info is as follows:

120 VAC
60 Hz, 72A, 86W
 
  #3  
Old 10-16-15, 05:49 AM
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Not easy to predict but using a lower frequency AC power can cause the power supply components to draw more current and overheat.

Not easy to predict but some electronic musical instruments with digital components may use the power line frequency for timing purposes possibly resulting in incorrect (such as too low) pitches and incorrect ( such as too slow) rhythms.

Most electronics require DC power. Typical analog electronics first rectify and filter the incoming AC power so the AC frequency is no longer relevant except for the aforementioned overheating of a transformer built into the equipment.

If you know what the internal voltages and maximum currents are, then you could replace the power supply with a 50 Hz power supply.
 
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Old 10-16-15, 08:43 AM
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Agreed, my guess is that this thing would have some type of industry standard switching DC power supply mounted inside, probably producing 5 and/or 12VDC. If you're willing to crack the case open and investigate, the power supply module can probably be replaced with a universal one capable of accepting 100-250VAC at 50 or 60 Hz which can be used anywhere in the world. These are essentially the exact same thing that powers PCs and laptops.
 
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Old 10-16-15, 09:06 AM
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Having travelled to the mid-east where it is 220/50hz, they do sell transformers for converting voltage but you will need one that also adjusts the frequency from sweden's 50hz back to the US standard 60hz. Here is something on Amazon: http://www.amazon.com/IF-VC-Internat.../dp/B00699IKWQ but I would assume a good electronics store in Sweden will have something similar.

- Peter
 
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Old 10-16-15, 09:29 AM
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From the questions and answers at Amazon:
In fact, this unit consists of two devices:
1. Step-down transformer from AC voltage 220 Volts 50 Hz to constant 12 Volts.
2. Regenerator voltage, which converts the DC 12 Volts to AC 120-Volt 60 Hertz.
That is, in this case the principle of double conversion. To get the voltage for the English turntable (if your power network has 120 Volts 60 Hz), you need to have the following:
1. Transformer from AC 120 V to DC 12 Volts.
2. Regenerator (inverter) from DC 12 V to AC 220 Volts 50 Hz (for example, automobile inverter).
So this tells you how perhaps you could do it. Use a locally available 12 volt DC power supply and a North American 120v/60Hz inverter that converts 12 volt DC to AC. Best to look for a better quality one that produces a true sine wave.
120 VAC
60 Hz, 72A, 86W
No, I think you miss read or misstyped. It would be .72 amps.
 

Last edited by PJmax; 10-16-15 at 11:31 AM. Reason: changed 7.2A to .72A
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Old 10-17-15, 07:58 AM
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Thanks everyone for your advice!

Ray, when you say a North American 120v/60hz inverter do you something like this?

500 Watt Pure Sine Wave Inverter 12V/24V/48V | GoHz.com

With a 12 volt dc adapter like the one I have in this photo?
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Old 10-17-15, 08:29 AM
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Yes, that is the correct type of inverter but the output Watts is more then you need so you might be able to save some by looking for one around 150-200 watts. (I'm figuring roughly double the 86 watts of the keyboard to give a little head room. Sometimes manufacturers are overly optimistic on the output figures.) Be sure the DC supply has enough watts to power the inverter.
 
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Old 10-19-15, 11:33 PM
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Hey Ray, I can't find any inverters that have the input for the 12v wall charger. They all seem to be set up to take a car battery. How exactly do you connect them together?

Thanks again for all the help
 
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Old 10-20-15, 12:32 AM
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A car battery is 12 volts so I'm not sure what you are asking. It will probably need to be hard wired if that is what you mean. Any plug on the output of the power supply removed and the wires connected directly to the inverter.
 
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Old 10-20-15, 04:09 AM
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excuse my very limited knowledge. but was wondering how exactly you hard wire the adapter end

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to the red and black imports on the back of the inverter

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Ive searched google trying to find info on this but cant find anything.

cheers
 
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Old 10-20-15, 05:18 AM
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Before you experiment with power

Don't know how many Kroner you paid for your ASR-10, but protect that investment. The ASR-10 is an application-specific computer with power supplys (120V 60Hz or 230V 50Hz) likely engineered expecting a pure sine wave input. Consumer grade converters will probably have a "dirty" output that MAY damage your synthesizer. More than a few of the "better" converters will probably exhibit the same problem.

Suggest you talk to an experienced local electronics repair person about what you propose. If you've already ordered them, have a electronics tech look at their output waveform with a purely resistive load (best case).
 
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Old 10-20-15, 07:23 AM
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how exactly you hard wire the adapter end
If you can find a female jack to match the power supply plug just solder your wires to it and plug in your power supply. Be sure you get the positive and negative correct. Use a multimeter to determine positive and negative, don't guess.

DC Power female jacks come in various sizes. Just an example, may not be the right size: http://www.trianglecables.com/produc...bWhxoCx2Pw_wcB

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Or if you can't find a jack to fit you cut the plug off and throw it away. It is cut to leave the ferite coil (the round thing) connected. The wires are then connected in the usual maner to the inverter Use a multimeter to determine which lead is positive and which is negative before connecting.

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If you have to ask a question this basic I agree with the Old Man:
Suggest you talk to an experienced local electronics repair person about what you propose. If you've already ordered them, have a electronics tech look at their output waveform with a purely resistive load (best case).
This may be beyond your skill level.
 

Last edited by ray2047; 10-20-15 at 09:00 AM.
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Old 10-20-15, 09:48 PM
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I think it would run fine using a step down transformer. Like someone already pointed out, most electronic equipments converts the AC input to a low, stablized DC voltage before using it.

The differences in frequency is probably not significant enough to affect anything. You can search for "travel transformer" on internet and get one that is > 100W. Using an inverter for this purpose is very inefficient.
 
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Old 10-23-15, 01:35 AM
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I would have used a stepdown transformer, (You may read this http://www.synfo.nl/servicemanuals/E...ICE_MANUAL.pdf )

It should be easy to get in Sweden due to the older Swedish regulations demanded a 110V outlet as maximum voltage in a bathroom. (abandoned regluations) Be careful with the real voltage, some transformers has high voltage at low current, and a considerable voltage drop at higher loads. Some travel adapters made for hairdryers are not suitable.

The HZ difference is usually not a problem on such small transformers.

Regards from Norway
dsk
 

Last edited by d_s_k; 10-23-15 at 01:36 AM. Reason: spelling
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Old 10-25-15, 02:58 AM
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Thanks everyone for your input!

d_s_k you are right. i found a guy who fixes up old keyboards including the ASR 10 and he said the Frequency is not an issue. i bought a step down converter as some of you recommended and it works perfectly!

Ray you are definitely right, soldering that stuff together is above my comfort level haha

cheers,
Ben
 
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Old 10-22-16, 09:39 AM
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Asr 10 rack from USA in Europe with Stepdown Converter

Hello,

I m Laurent from Belgium, i also bought ASR 10 rack from USA.

@Benthomas, can you tell me if the "STEPDOWN CONVERTER" works with the ASR 10 R and, if it works the spécifications of this item ?

I want to plug the ASR in France.

Thank u !
 
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Old 10-22-16, 09:54 AM
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Welcome to the forums.

Benthomas has not been back here since his last reply so he's not likely to answer your question. You can click on his name and send him a private message.

If you read what he's written he says that a small low power converter worked.
That's the key.... small and low power.
 
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Old 10-25-16, 12:38 AM
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Hello, ok thank u PJMAX !
 
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Old 10-25-16, 05:08 AM
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Ill guess this product will be more than plenty, and I would have been looking for something not that expensive, but it should be safe, and it has text showing the seller knows what it is. http://www.ebay.com/itm/SIMRAN-Step-...3D301704371089
This one would need a box and some work:
http://www.ebay.com/itm/FR78B-230115...3D301704371089
Do not use electronic travel adapters made for hairdryers etc.

dsk
 
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Old 11-12-16, 07:32 AM
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Asr 10 rack from USA in Europe with Stepdown Converter

Ok, thank u dsk ! I search the "best safe" solution.
 
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