Adding an appliance to my food trailer

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  #1  
Old 11-01-15, 06:20 PM
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Adding an appliance to my food trailer

So, I currently have the standard 50 Amp (RV) service/main breaker panel supplying my food trailer (external at the pole). I am looking to install a 120/208-240 commercial undercounter dishwasher. If I run this circuit/split from the main breaker panel (internal trailer) on its own 50 amp breaker min./max. as per manufacturer requirement. Will it trip the breaker panel's main breaker installed in the trailer panel or the external main breaker as well if i have other devices powered? Such as lights, small appliances on the counters, etc.. Nothing else installed in the system requires this much power. I hope I am explaining my intentions as to paint the picture for what i want to accomplish here. All input would be greatly appreciated. Nothing is final as far as any purchases have gone. Just want to set myself up for the future, to facilitate this addition if any changes would be needed.
 
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Old 11-01-15, 08:35 PM
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How many amps does the dish washer draw at 240 volts? What or the other current loads in amps on the circuit other than lighting?
 
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Old 11-01-15, 09:35 PM
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An under counter dishwasher in a food trailer ?

A 50A dishwasher on a 50A service could spell trouble based on other loads like Ray mentioned.
 
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Old 11-01-15, 09:36 PM
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Thank you for replying. This is the only info I can find right now on the unit. It's the LXiH with a rated amperage of 37.7 according to this table. I will have to call Hobart to obtain that specific information on the washer. For the other components I have them in house and I can retrieve with no problem. Thank you again for your time and I will post back once I obtain that information for you.

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Old 11-02-15, 04:15 AM
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Just a guess , but it may / probably had a pretty significant hot water booster heater . Will you be feeding it hot water from another heater ? Or cold water ?

When you say food trailer , is this a food concession ? Will you be washing dishes off and on all day ? Or just once , at the end of the day ? When you might be able to shut everything else off , except a light or two ?

God bless
Wyr
 
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Old 11-02-15, 04:35 AM
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Where I am food trucks are very regulated and would need a permit to make changes.
Is a permit part of your plan?
Is your truck in a fixed location?

If power is a problem they are more costly to run but dishwashers with chemical disinfection are less expensive to purchase and require a very small amount of power.
 
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Old 11-02-15, 07:15 AM
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It will technically work on your 50A hookup, however I would be concerned that where ever you're plugging in may not be able to supply a full 50. Carnivals and camp grounds are usually pretty light on infrastructure or run everything off generators which might not be able to keep up with that appliance.
 
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Old 11-02-15, 06:43 PM
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Thank you all for the replies. Correct me if I'm wrong but from my understanding the 50 amp hookup is actually capable of supplying 100 amps total, due to the fact that there are 2/50 amp 120v feeds supplying the panel equaling a total of 240v thus 100 amps. This style washer is the HI temp and yes it does require the heat booster which is the reason for this power requirement. With that being said it only requires that amount of power for a brief moment due to the fact that the total cycle time is only 90 seconds. The remainder of the cycle is powered with 120v until finish. My plan is to attach the washers water supply directly to my water heater which is a tank less on demand propane unit to assist in the temperature gain reducing the 240v time requirement to obtain 180. The unit only uses .74 gallons of water per cycle which is crucial when you do not have a water supply and you are limited to the holding tank on board. I am trying to avoid chemicals due to the harshness and wear on my cooking supplies. So I am thinking that even with the washer on its own circuit I could get away with adding to the circuit because at 240v it is drawing 37.7 amps for maybe 30 seconds. As long as I do not exceed the total 50 amp rating for that circuit like (Ray) said. As long as I am aware that when I do run the washer to be mindful of what else may be on or plugged into that circuit. This would then leave me technically with a whole additional 50amp/120v circuit to distribute among-st my fridge, and other misc. items. This application is for periodic/minimal use throughout the day, if needed. And when I am sterilizing my jars for my BBQ sauce while bottling.
 
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Old 11-02-15, 06:55 PM
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So, this is my smoker and my concession trailer. Thank you again for all the helpful input. I am actually active duty and this is just a hobby of mine considering I am originally from NC. Its a work in progress and I can finally see the light at the end of the tunnel.

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Old 11-02-15, 06:55 PM
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Your supply can supply up to 50 amps at 240 or 100 amps balanced at 120. If one leg pulls more than 50 amps the main will trip.

Since the DW is 240 it will pull equally on the service. The DW is almost maxing out the service.
 
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Old 11-02-15, 07:13 PM
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Lightbulb

I understand. That was the explanation that I was looking for. So, ideally I need to find a unit that has a way less amperage draw and capable of doing the same job. Because that draw does not leave me/nor anyone else who doesn't know the system much wiggle room when you crank that bad boy up. Plus with aging and wear I would assume the draw will only increase?
 
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Old 11-02-15, 07:37 PM
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ideally I need to find a unit that has a way less amperage draw and capable of doing the same job.
In post #6 Greg wrote:
If power is a problem they are more costly to run but dishwashers with chemical disinfection are less expensive to purchase and require a very small amount of power.
.
 
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Old 11-02-15, 08:40 PM
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Yes. I read that. That's why I mentioned I am trying to avoid chemical washers due to the harshness and deteriorating capabilities on my cookware.
 
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Old 11-02-15, 09:51 PM
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One restaurant I did repair work at used a large metal pan heated by a gas burner to sanitize dishes after hand washing. I'd never seen that before and out of curiosity asked about it and was told it was a health department approved method so long as temperature and time to soak was met.
 
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Old 11-03-15, 04:05 AM
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Your dish washer is going to pull 37.7 amps on each of the 2 hots . Quit trying to convince yourself that you some how have an extra 50 amps to spare .

By code , you have just maxed out your 50 amp 240 VAC supply . But , I am just guessing here , but , I guess there is light at the end of the tunnel .

First , these code calculations are biased on continuous duty , which , as I remember it is defined to be 3 hours or more . 37.7 amps x 1.25 ( for continuous duty ) = 47.125 amps - 50 amps is the next closest circuit breaker rating ( and wire size rating ) .

I think you said the electric booster heater is only going to run for a very short time .

Next , that propane fired water heater is probably going to save you . The more heat energy it adds to the water , the less heat energy the electric booster heater will have to add to the water . Do yourself a favor & really insulate your water piping , especially the hot water piping .

Try to run the propane water heater as hot as is practical .

Lastly , if you can control when you use the dish washer . Try to run it when little else but the lights are on .

Best of luck :-)
Wyr
God bless
 
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Old 11-03-15, 04:27 AM
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Not sure what you mean by "harshness and deteriorating capabilities" of chemical dishwashers.
They use three "chemicals" during a wash cycle.
Two of them are a standard dishwasher soap and rinse agent which would be the same as used in a high temperature machine.(Some use a drying agent).

The third product they use which will replace the need for high temperatures found in a standard dishwasher is a disinfectant.
Most use a specific strength of sodium hypochlorite which is common household bleach but the concentration when dispensed is only about 2 - 3 times that found in normal drinking water.

You really would do well to reconsider this type of machine as it appears to be a perfect fit for your application.
 
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