New home wiring questions

Reply

  #1  
Old 11-14-15, 11:41 PM
B
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Nov 2015
Posts: 21
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
New home wiring questions

I am doing some new wiring in my home ect I want to be over code on my electrical wiring. I am planning on using 10 2 wire for my outlets, lights, ect. I am only planning on running about 6 outlets per circuit/breaker. I am planning on using 20 amp breakers. I am planning on using the heavy 20 amp receptacles/outlets. I know 10 2 wire is stiff and can be hard to work with and expensive and that is fine with me. I am going to be installing an electric cook stove and a 220 volt window ac/heater, I am planning on using heavy 6 3 wire. Any advice or comments or help would be appreciated. Thanks. O and would this be safe and over kill for the Springfield mo area. Thanks.
 
  #2  
Old 11-14-15, 11:49 PM
PJmax's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Northern NJ - USA
Posts: 60,919
Received 1,344 Votes on 1,242 Posts
I know 10 2 wire is stiff and can be hard to work with
You have no idea.

You do not want to use 10-2 NM for receptacles. Use 12-2 instead. No need to use 20A receptacles unless you have an appliance that needs that receptacle. Basic receptacles are rated for 20A pass thru and will perform fine. Use a better grade device.... spec grade or preferred grade for maximum life. Refrain from using the push in terminals on the back of the devices.

#12 wiring in general is tough to work with. Many people use #12 for everything. That's foolish. I do all my lighting wiring in #14 wiring on 15A breakers. There is no need to have to jam #12 wiring in a switch box.... it just makes everything cramped.

Based on the current draw of the stove..... 6/3 w/ground should be ok.
Check the plate for the A/C-heater. That may require a 10-2w/ground.
 
  #3  
Old 11-14-15, 11:57 PM
B
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Nov 2015
Posts: 21
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
I wired my whole shop with 10 2 and it worked out very well boxes ain't that full I didn't use the push in type of receptacles the kind I used tightened down with a screw and over all I was very happy the way it turned out and I have a ton of the heavy stuff left and can probably do almost my whole house with it. Is there any where that says I can not use it in home for code reasons?
 
  #4  
Old 11-15-15, 01:03 AM
PJmax's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Northern NJ - USA
Posts: 60,919
Received 1,344 Votes on 1,242 Posts
If you're comfortable working with the larger wire.... that's fine. Code allows you to use larger wire but it must be fused no higher than 20A. for general purpose receptacle circuits.
 
  #5  
Old 11-15-15, 07:31 AM
A
Member
Join Date: Jun 2012
Location: USA
Posts: 1,650
Received 48 Votes on 43 Posts
Check your devices for support. They may only be listed for up to 12 gauge wire. So using 10 means that the wires don't attach right so would NOT be safe.

http://www.leviton.com/OA_HTML/ibcGe...minisite=10251 - "Terminal screws accept up to #12 AWG copper or copper clad wire."
 
  #6  
Old 11-15-15, 09:10 AM
B
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Nov 2015
Posts: 21
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Yes I use commercial outlets that feed from the back and tighten down with a screw I am being very safe with this thank you
 
  #7  
Old 11-16-15, 08:10 AM
I
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Near Lansing, Michigan
Posts: 10,943
Received 44 Votes on 42 Posts
The other thing to watch for is box fill. Standard residential boxes are rated for #14 and #12. If you use #10, you will need "extra deep" boxes, and only one cable in, one cable out. If you have boxes with three cables, you'll need to step up to a 4x4 square box with a mud ring to have adequate cubic inches for the bending radius of the #10.
 
  #8  
Old 11-16-15, 08:26 AM
B
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Nov 2015
Posts: 21
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Where do you get extra deep boxes never even heard of them
 
  #9  
Old 11-16-15, 08:47 AM
I
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Near Lansing, Michigan
Posts: 10,943
Received 44 Votes on 42 Posts
It's a marketing term usually applied to the >=3" deep boxes. If you have a box with one #10 cable in, one #10 cable out and one device, you need at least 18 cubic inches. That requires a single-gang box at least 3" deep.

If you have a box with three #10 cables plus a device, you need 22.5 cubic inches, which are the deepest possible box you can fit in a 2x4 wall (3-1/2" or 3-5/8" box). These can be tricky to use though because it is difficult to keep the cable greater than the code mandated 1-1/4" from the nailing surface on the other side of the wall.
 
  #10  
Old 11-16-15, 10:15 AM
B
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Nov 2015
Posts: 21
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Ok I understand now thank you
 
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: