Can 220 be converted into 2 seperate 110 lines?

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Old 04-08-01, 02:06 PM
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During a recent remodeling, I had the builder wire a line into the breaker box to be run out to my workshop and to the pool to run the pump. He wired it up as 220 using 6 ga. wire. Can I wire two seperate lines to this wire? In the breaker box, he has white to a breaker, black to another breaker, bare to the other side. The red wire has been clipped off. Wouldn't I wire one line to black and bare and the other line to white and bare? Also, not being electrically knowledgable, what would I do to assure these lines were properly grounded?
 
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Old 04-08-01, 02:37 PM
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brjranch;
you'll need black & red for hots, white for nuetral, bare for ground. would this, if it happens, replace your pool pump?
 
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Old 04-08-01, 04:16 PM
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I'm not an electrician, but to add a bit of detail to wirenuts' reply, you have 6/3-with-ground wire and you should be able to run the pool pump and 110v circuits with it, I think.
At least I've done it with my boathouse since 1995.
From a 20 amp gfci breaker in the panel, I ran 10/3-with-ground to a breaker box and split 220v (red, black hots and green ground) to the 3/4 hp boatlift motor and one hot each, the white neutral and bare ground to a 110v lighting circuit and a 110v outlet circuit.
In the panel (turn the main breaker OFF, but remember that the two legs above it are still HOT), the red and black (hot)wires need to be on the breaker, the white (neutral for the 110v) needs to be in the panel neutral bar, and the bare ground wire should be in the panel ground bar.
Just look to see where the rest of the matching wires are.
The 220v pool pump needs red and black hot wires only (no white neutral) and a ground.
The 110v circuits need EITHER one red or one black, a white, and a ground wire.
I'm sure that one of the pro electricians here can help you with code and more detail, but that's how I did something similar. I have no idea if it is to code, but it works, and I haven't fried myself yet.
Good Luck!
Mike

 
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Old 04-08-01, 05:17 PM
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thanks Mike!
good to detail things here, i tend to be too quick.

brjranch;
the 110 will come from either Black to White OR Red to White. the bare ground is a saftey for all metallic parts.

the only other concern(s) would be

1) the load introduced on the existing pool pump circuit, which was most likely sized for the pump only.

2)is this a directly wired pump, and/or is there a GFI involved at the pump?
 
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Old 04-08-01, 07:00 PM
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I was trying hard to find the word "subpanel" in the previous replies, but I don't think it's there.

The only way to get 120 volts from a 240 volt line is by installing a subpanel.

In the main panel: I think you're going to need that red wire that was "clipped off". I'm very surprised to hear that it is clipped off. Normally, I would have expected the black and red to be attached to the breaker, the white to the neutral bar, and the bare to the grounding bar. I think you're going to have to rewire it to be this way -- geez, I hope he left you enough slack in the red wire to do this!

In your shop, you will then install a subpanel. If all this sounds good to you, post back and one of us will help you with the subpanel wiring.
 
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Old 04-09-01, 02:28 PM
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brjranch, wirenuts, and John:
What I called a "breaker box" IS correctly called a subpanel by professionals and more experienced D-I-Y electricians.
I'm just not one. LOL.
I just tend to use my simple terminology (i.e. breaker box, 220v, 110v, etc.).
brjranch, the subpanel has a single cut-off breaker and it is where I ran the 240v to and the 240v and 120v circuits from, wired as we're all describing.
Mike
 
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Old 04-09-01, 05:44 PM
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YOu have some special requirements involving a pool.

YOur pool pump must be a four wire cable with the fourth wire [grounding wire] that must be insulated with green insulation. This pool pump must not have anything else on that circuit except a GFI control if required and a switch nothing else is allowed on that circuit. Remember that all four wires must be insulated. If you hard wire the pool pump then a GFI is not required but a form of disconnect is required in sight from and not more that 50'. This disconnect must be 10' away from the pool unless with a twist lock receptacle or hard wired. If a receptacle is used with this pool pump then GFI protection is required.



YOur pool light if you have one also have the same dedictated requirement but must be GFI protected.


Now this is where it all ties together. YOur feeder to your workshop may be a three wire cable 240 volt but must have a ground rod as a new grounding source and this panel being fed would be required to be a main panel. A sub panel would not be allowed from the main dwelling unless the feeders feeding that sub panel in your work shop is with 4 insulated wires just like the pool pump.

Hope this help

Wg
 
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