Adding a receptacle to a bathroom


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Old 11-21-15, 05:03 AM
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Adding a receptacle to a bathroom

this house was built in 1962 and has the original wiring and it isnt a grounded system. What I mean by it not being ungrounded is that all the plugs have have 2 slots with no ground slot. There's no plug in the bathroom now though and it's very inconvenient. I was thinking of changing the light switch with a plug/switch combonation or adding a plug next to the light switch becasue the existing switch is pretty close to the vanity. It a small bathroom. Would this work?
 
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Old 11-21-15, 05:35 AM
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One of the pro electricians should be along with a better answer, but for starters any outlet in the bath would need to be GFCI. There are ways to do this, but I'm not qualified to be giving the advice on it.
 
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Old 11-21-15, 06:13 AM
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The switch box might not have a neutral. If you see only one black wire and one white connected to the switch, the white wire is not a neutral. It's a switch leg and can't be used to feed a receptacle.

Let us know if you need help testing for 120V
 
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Old 11-21-15, 07:23 AM
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I hadn't thought of that but I do see what you're saying. I wonder if they still make those light fixtures with plugs on the side like they used to? I havent looked at any bath fixtures in a long long time.
 
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Old 11-21-15, 07:33 AM
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"Plugs"

When you say "plug", do you mean receptacle?
 
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Old 11-21-15, 08:10 AM
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I wonder if they still make those light fixtures with plugs on the side like they used to?
Yes, I have seen a couple new fixtures with receptacles, but they still must be GFCI protected or it would be creating a code violation. Many jursidictions won't allow them.

I was thinking of changing the light switch with a plug/switch combonation or adding a plug next to the light switch becasue the existing switch is pretty close to the vanity. It a small bathroom. Would this work?
You aren't allowed to extend an ungrounded circuit. The best option would be to run a new 20 amp circuit and fish it into the wall to an old work box and install the new 15A tamper resistant GFCI receptacle.

NOTE: UL requirements on GFCI receptacles changed in June 2015 to require all new GFCI receptacles and circuit breakers to have a self test function. GFCI receptacles now cost about twice what they used to. Google UL 943 for more information.
 
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Old 11-21-15, 11:33 AM
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Yes, plug=receptacle. Years ago, there was a light fixture with a receptacle on it in the bathroom and we changed it for cosmetic reasons. Seems like I could change it back without violating code but i dont know. Adding another circuit so I can install a ground fault protected receptacle is out of the question. I would have to change the breaker box and everything. I'm to old and poor to get into all that.
 
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Old 11-21-15, 04:33 PM
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Tell us the number and colors of the wiring at the switch box.

The code would require a new 20 amp circuit for the receptacle.

Your wiring may have a ground that is in the back of the box. What type of wiring is it?
 
 

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