30 amp panel

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  #1  
Old 11-22-15, 09:16 PM
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30 amp panel

hey guys,

I built a shed and wanted to add 30 amp to the shed. I have done parts of the work. My shed is about 100 feet from house. I live in Washington state. so I put a 100 amp main breaker panel in shed with grounding system(2 8ft ground rods greater than 6 feet apart). I want to replace the 100 amp main breaker with a 30 amp single pole breaker and then run 8-2 with a ground from the house panel(where I have a 30 amp single pole breaker) to the shed.

all I am running is a couple lights(15 amp circuit) and a 20 amp outlt (20 amp circuit).

I am running it in 1 1/4 conduit. plan to use 8-2 with ground in house and 8-2 thwn from house to shed in the conduit.

just wanting to see if this all seems ok
thanks in advance
 
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  #2  
Old 11-22-15, 09:30 PM
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The main breaker can remain. It can be the disconnect for the panel. The 30 at the house will protect the wires. There is nothing wrong with conduit that large, but you could drop to 1".
 
  #3  
Old 11-22-15, 10:24 PM
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You only need 10-3 for 30 amp if the distance is under 200 feet and no heavy motor or heating loads..
 
  #4  
Old 11-22-15, 10:32 PM
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thanks for your feedback, I appreciate it.

so if I understand you right. at house panel I can put a 30 amp single pole and run 8-2 with a ground to the shed. leave the 100 amp double pole breaker that came with panel and just connect the hot to one pole of the breaker.

I didn't know if this was ok or if I should replace the 100 amp double pole breaker with a single 30 pole.

I only need 120 and not 240 so was trying to save money by running 8-2 vs 8-3 both with grounds.

thanks for your help
 
  #5  
Old 11-23-15, 04:10 AM
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I only need 120 and not 240 so was trying to save money by running 8-2 vs 8-3
You only need #10 not #8. See my previous post. Using 10-2 instead of 10-3 won't save enough to be worth it in my opinion. Yes, the breaker in the sub panel is used only as a disconnect switch so as long as it is equal to or greater than the breaker protecting the circuit it is fine.
 
  #6  
Old 11-23-15, 08:23 AM
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It would be a good idea to futureproof your installation by installing 8-3 cabling that would support 40 amps at 240 volts.

A 10-3 (2 allotments of 30 amps at 120 volts) would be superior to an 8-2 (one allotment of 40 amps).
.
 
  #7  
Old 11-23-15, 10:01 AM
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I only need 120 and not 240 so was trying to save money by running 8-2 vs 8-3 both with grounds.
If you want to save money all you really need is a multiwire branch circuit. Install 10-3 UF cable protected by a 2 pole 20 amp breaker. Add a $7 disconnect at the shed and save the price of a 100 amp main breaker panel with breakers. Presto! You have 2 - 20 amp 120 volt circuits!
 
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