New Electrical Garage Heater

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  #1  
Old 11-28-15, 03:06 PM
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New Electrical Garage Heater

Hi there!

First time in this forum so bear with me

I am about to purchase this heater for my garage: DR. Heater DR966

So far, I do not see foresee any difficulties with the installation, however I have a question regarding the wiring.

According to the specs, the heater is hardwired so in theory I should be able to go from my breaker to the heater straight, correct ?

This is what I need to buy:
  1. A dual pole circuit breaker rating at least 240V 35A as a main cutoff switch
  2. Supply cables 10AWG

Now, since I will do a ceiling installation, I am not sure whether it is better to get the wires out of any of the two side walls or if I am obliged by the Canadian Electrical Code for NB to let it come from the attic ?

A picture is worth a thousand words... the text in the picture quotes:
Wires from the ceiling or from any of the two side walls?

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The general electrical panel is in the basement, I will get the wires right under the door and then I will have to go up towards the attic.
Now, given that I will have to be in the attic to fix the bracket, I can pull the wire to the attic as well, it is just a bit more work.

Another question, when drilling the OSB to pull the cable from the ceiling, is there anything I need to put in there to fix the cable in the hole or should I leave it free? My question is purely for aesthetics as the cable will go to the wire box of the heater.

Thank you for any good advice you can provide for this project.

Alex
 
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  #2  
Old 11-28-15, 03:23 PM
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Welcome to the forums.


According to the specs, the heater is hardwired so in theory I should be able to go from my breaker to the heater straight, correct ?
Incorrect..... unless the unit is in line of sight of the panel or you will need a two pole switch to remove power from the unit for servicing.

I like to run my power wiring out of sight and come out into the back of a 1900 (4" square) electrical box, put the switch in a 1900 cover and come out of the box with MC (metal clad) cable or seal tite to the unit.
 
  #3  
Old 11-28-15, 04:49 PM
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Hi PJMax,

Thanks for you comment.

Are you saying that I need two dual pole circuit breakers, one at the general and the other next to the heater??
My idea was to use the breaker at the panel to switch off the power in case of servicing.

From the general panel, I would run the cable (luckily I have a drop ceiling) towards the garage door (the one you see in the picture), and then just go up to the attic and drill where the heater will be installed.


Alex
 
  #4  
Old 11-28-15, 04:57 PM
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You just need a means of disconnection at the heater itself. It can be a double pole disconnect switch. It must be in sight of the heater.

You really need #8 wire, not #10, if the circuit is protected at 35 A.
 
  #5  
Old 11-28-15, 05:08 PM
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OK I understand, is this also requested from the Canadian code?

Regarding the wire, I just took for good what they mentioned on their specs:

Supply cables shall be 10 AWG (5.3 mm 2 ) copper wires
The heater must be connected to individual branch circuit protected by
35 Amp circuit breaker only.
Supply cables must be equipped with a dual pole circuit breaker rating
at least 240V 35A/pole as main cutoff switch of power connection to the
heater.
Thank you!
Alex
 

Last edited by pcboss; 12-11-15 at 05:37 AM. Reason: formatting
  #6  
Old 11-28-15, 05:45 PM
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In the U.S. #10 can not be used on a 35 amp circuit. It would need #8. How many amps is the heater?
 
  #7  
Old 11-28-15, 05:54 PM
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The heater is 25A so that is probably why they recommend #10 and 35A in case of picks when, for instance, you switch to 6000W.

Alex
 
  #8  
Old 11-30-15, 06:33 PM
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Hi,

Today I have been to a couple of local electrical suppliers in town, they both told me they have never seen a 35A breaker, meaning, it's either 30A or 40A or special order.
Now, I can order it on the internet or ask them to order it for me, but that is not my point, given that I have to use a switch in the garage, the switch is either 30A or 40A too, what would be the sense for me to use a 30A switch and a 35A breaker ?

The heater manufacturer indicates a 35A protection for this heater given that it is 240V - 6000W, so in theory with the 20% tolerance I can understand where this is coming from.

What shall I do at this point, having only the possibility to choose between a 35A or 40A switch?
Which combination switch/breaker would you recommend?

Thank you
Alex
 
  #9  
Old 11-30-15, 06:51 PM
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what would be the sense for me to use a 30A switch and a 35A breaker
You can use a 60 amp unfused air conditioner disconnect (they are cheap and you get a box for wiring) with a 35 amp breaker. You could also use a fused air condition disconnect with 35 amp fuses on a 40 amp breaker.
 

Last edited by pcboss; 12-11-15 at 05:38 AM.
  #10  
Old 11-30-15, 06:59 PM
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You can use a 60 amp unfused air conditioner disconnect (their cheap and you get a box for wiring) with a 35 amp breaker
What would be the advantage over a 40A Switch/35A Breaker ?

Thank you
Alex
 
  #11  
Old 11-30-15, 07:25 PM
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None except perhaps cost. In the US often less then $10 for a pull out version and you don't need a box. A 40 amp toggle switch would be $30-$40 and you would need a box. For reference: GE 60-Amp 240-Volt Non-Fuse Metallic AC Disconnect-TFN60RCP - The Home Depot
 
  #12  
Old 11-30-15, 07:33 PM
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What would be the advantage over a 40A Switch/35A Breaker ?
You won't find a 40 amp switch and would have to use a 60 amp switch.
 
  #13  
Old 12-01-15, 08:37 AM
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I see what you mean, thank you.

Given that those 'disconnects' are meant for AC, would that be acceptable to code instead of an ordinary switch?

Thank you
Alex
 
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Old 12-01-15, 08:46 AM
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They are just called air conditioner disconnects because that is their most common use not because that is their only intended use.
 

Last edited by ray2047; 12-10-15 at 06:06 PM.
  #15  
Old 12-01-15, 08:53 AM
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Thank you very much for your help.

I think I am all set, if any issues, I will ask here!

Thank you
Alex
 
  #16  
Old 12-10-15, 05:18 PM
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Hi all!

I am back with my garage heater project, eventually I managed to put the main stuff needed together and now I hope I can do the work this weekend:

- Dr. Heater DR-966
- 10/2 AWG cable (red & black)
- 35A breaker
- Eaton disconnect DPB222R

I will attach the heater with its mounting bracket to the ceiling, the heater wiring is as in the picture below:

What is the best way to join these wires to the corresponding 10/2 cable that will connect this load to the disconnect switch?

Thank you
Alex
 
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  #17  
Old 12-10-15, 06:08 PM
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Wire nuts. .
 
  #18  
Old 12-12-15, 09:08 AM
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Hi,

I have all sorts of doubts now, after having read the safety information sheet of the garage heater:

This portable heater should only be used it is plugged into an electrical outlet that provides a snug and secure fit.
A loose fit between the AC outlet (receptable) and the plug may cause overheating and distortion of the plug. If the plug does not fit securely into the outlet, or if the plug becomes very hot, the outlet may be replaced. Contact a qualified repairman to replace the outlet. Always plug the heater directly into a wall outlet/receptable. Never use an extention cord or relocatable power tap (outlet/power strip).
Does it mean that I am obliged to use a power cord to get it to work?

My intention was to directly connect the supply line to the load and operate the unit using the disconnect switch.
Do you see anything wrong in doind what I was planning to?

Thank you
Alex
 
  #19  
Old 12-12-15, 09:15 AM
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They are only warning you of the hazards of a loose plug/connection. You are far better off with a direct connection.
 
  #20  
Old 12-21-15, 09:08 AM
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Hi folks,

I finished my project, the garage heater is working perfectly and although the project was time consuming due to the 20m/65ft 10/2 cable through 21 joists, I am satisfied with the end result.

Thank you very much for your help and, enjoy the festivities!

Alex
 
  #21  
Old 12-21-15, 09:18 AM
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We'll enjoy the festivities and you enjoy the heat.
 
  #22  
Old 01-31-16, 09:47 AM
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I am confused with the installation of the dr966 cealin heater. It comes with awg10/2 wire but im running a double pole 20 amp breaker. Do you think i can wire nut 12 gauge wire. With 10 gauge wire
 
  #23  
Old 01-31-16, 01:55 PM
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Hi Luis,

With the DR-966 you cannot use a 20A dual pole breaker, you will need a 35A.
Please, read the thread, all the doubts I had during the installation are answered, but definitely follow what it is clearly stated in the manual:

- 35A dual pole breaker
- 10/2 AWG

Also, you will need a switch, unless your breaker in line of sight.

Cheers
Alex
 
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