Move 240v range outlet

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  #1  
Old 12-01-15, 01:56 PM
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Move 240v range outlet

Hello,

I have an electric range outlet that is located where I cannot push my oven back against the wall.

I have opened up the wall to see if there was enough slack in the feed wire to move the outlet lower 8", but no luck. The wall is only 3.5" deep on the inside so recessing the outlet is not possible either.

Is there safe way to move this outlet without running a new feed wire back to the electrical panel? (80+ feet).

Is it possible to re-purpose the existing outlet box as a junction box and splice a new length of feed wire to move the outlet into a new box lower on the wall? if so, how would this splice be done safely?

Any assistance is appreciated.

Thanks!
 
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  #2  
Old 12-01-15, 02:16 PM
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Welcome to the forums!

First a question: How many wires do you have in the box?
 
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Old 12-01-15, 02:16 PM
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You will have enough room in wall for recessing box. I have mine that way. Also a box in wall with splices are ok as long as you leave a cover plate.
 
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Old 12-01-15, 02:17 PM
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A range receptacle can be recessed in a 3.5" wall. Use a 4-11/16" square x 2.5" deep metal box with a 1/2" raised double gang ring.
 
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Old 12-01-15, 02:18 PM
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Guys, I think his box is too high on the wall.
 
  #6  
Old 12-01-15, 02:43 PM
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There are 4 wires (3x8 AWG, 1x10 AWG) in the outlet box connected to a double pole 40 AMP breaker at the panel.

Currently, the box itself is inside the wall and the outlet is "flush" with the surface of the wall. I cannot push the box back any further into the wall because it is too shallow and I cannot get the outlet recessed. This makes my range stand out about 2" from the wall due to the thickness of the plug.

If I could move the box down the wall about 8" inches, there is a void in the back of the range that would allow my to push the range back to the wall.

I was hoping to remove the outlet from the existing box, splice in a new length of wire to another box lower in the wall where I will put the outlet. I would leave an accessible cover on the new junction box.

I'm not sure what I can use to safely splice 8 and 10 AWG wire together, or if it's even safe to do so. Any advice here would be helpful.

Thanks again.
 
  #7  
Old 12-01-15, 02:50 PM
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Big blue wire nuts will handle two #8 assuming copper. Red will handle #10
 
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Old 12-01-15, 03:28 PM
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Wire nuts cannot be used if you have aluminum conductors, but it does not sound like you do.

Does the cable come up from the floor or x down from the ceiling?
 
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Old 12-01-15, 04:52 PM
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I was hoping to remove the outlet from the existing box, splice in a new length of wire to another box lower in the wall where I will put the outlet. I would leave an accessible cover on the new junction box.
This is a good plan. Big blue wire nuts if your going copper to copper. You can use split bolts with a gob of tape or some insulated splices like this:

[ATTACH=CONFIG]59521[/ATTACH]

Bummer is the splices are about $11 each, while wire nuts are about 50 cents each.
 
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Old 12-01-15, 05:05 PM
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Thanks for the advice!

It's copper wire coming from the ceiling, but there is zero slack or extra wire. I went into the attic and traced it back to the panel and i cannot get the 8-10" I need to move the outlet.

I'll probably opt for the wirenut approach, maybe with some electrical tape for extra protection.
 
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Old 12-01-15, 06:10 PM
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No need for tape. It will just become a sticky mess.
 
  #12  
Old 12-03-15, 02:53 PM
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I pulled apart this outlet and it turns out that this is a 60 amp circuit and the wires are larger than I previously thought.

There are 3 x 6 AWG wires and a 10 AWG ground wire, so I don't think I can use the Big Blue wire nuts to splice a connection.

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Can you send me the source for the insulated splices pictured above? I think that's what I'm going to have to use to move this outlet.

Thanks!
 
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Old 12-03-15, 03:02 PM
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Big blue wire nuts are good for 2 #6's.

You will need an electrical supply house for the Polaris splices.
 
  #14  
Old 12-03-15, 03:58 PM
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turns out that this is a 60 amp circuit
I'd recommend changing the breaker to a 50 or 40 amp. I prefer using a 40 amp breaker, but there are a few ranges that recommend a 50 amp breaker.
 
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